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Lucas

‘The conservatory is framed by two anchor points, the entrance at the east end and the orangery to the west.’
‘The owners have restored the property, adding an orangery at the back and a Johnny Grey-designed kitchen and laundry, as well as planting 5,000 trees.’
‘In the end I was too terrified to drink anything other than patriotic Pakola, a green-coloured soft drink and migraine-inducing orangeade called Mirinda.’
‘In summer my parents had sometimes taken me to the big public beach where they'd laid a blanket on the sand, weighting the corners with their shoes and a thermos of lemonade or orangeade.’
‘We got flat Coke, orangeade and cherryade.’
‘At the time I told her the truth - we'd made a raft and when we fell off, we were rescued by a man on a barge and taken to a wedding reception where someone gave me orangeade.’
‘The streets were damp and gloomy, rain streaming beneath sodium street lamps like showers of orangeade.’
‘And there were bottles of Corona lemonade, limeade, orangeade and cherryade.’
‘Amy reached for the drink which she had presumed was orangeade and took a sip.’
‘He took pics of slugs, orangeade, meals, views through car and plane windows, his dog - whatever - and they looked so good.’
‘When we got back to our dressing room we had some sandwiches, stuffed rolls, orangeade and lemonade.’

-

Lucas

‘Leo McIntire then took over her mantle but his eloquent oration and superlatives went over the head of Brendan Bradley, who had to ask me what some of the big words meant.’
‘They were enraptured by Mr Durai's fiery oration.’
‘It spirals from crisp oration into stream-of-consciousness babble and finally into gibberish.’
‘In contrast, however, to the stereotype of the reserved, stoic Indian, Creeks respected impassioned public speakers, and lengthy oration was common at council meetings.’
‘Why do we admire musical ability and adept oration?’
‘Their aptitude for charismatic and persuasive oration has earned some particularly articulate Griots positions as spokesmen for politicians and presidents.’
‘A new swimming pool was added and an orangery restored to its former glory.’
‘The site featured an orangery, a pagoda, and an archway designed by the architect Sir William Chambers.’
‘The Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, one of London's great wonders, had its origins in the seventeenth century, when a private family estate development included a noted orangery.’
‘My own veranda in Cockermouth is a larger example, as is the more ostentatious orangery at Brockhole.’
‘In traditional European orangeries, the classic container is 24 inches square and deep, and painted white.’
‘There were once melon houses, fig houses, banana houses, orangeries and just about every exotic fruit was once grown here.’
‘Prague Castle has had an orangery since the middle of the fifteenth century.’
‘The plans also include a new orangery and three town houses.’
‘They can also walk through the huge orangery built by the Adam brothers which has now been converted into a gallery to display the fine Lansdowne collection of paintings and sculpture.’
‘One of the long-running projects has been the orangery.’
‘Conservation - minded neighbours have objected to his plans to attach an orangery to his house to make him feel more at home in this bleak heath.’
‘It was originally constructed as an orangery for Augustus the Strong who was an avid art collector.’
‘All this, together with the stone walls, recalls a Victorian conservatory or orangery rather than a conventional museum, and is only possible because most sculpture, unlike paintings, is not vulnerable to light.’
‘A colonnade, on the north, is formed of six Ionic columns, and on the east is an entrance through an orangery.’
‘Sir James and Lady Graham have recently restored the orangery and at present the attractions include beds of peonies.’
‘The one exception to that is the orangery, which is where the restaurant is found.’
‘Arthur Myers, who has worked on the estate near Sproatley for more than 40 years - and at the age of 83 still looks after the orangery - was at the opening with wife Jasmine.’
‘Among its attractions are its trees along with a large collection of wisteria, grown inside the orangery.’

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Lucas

‘The theme of the most famous of those orations is democracy.’
‘Martin Nevin, chairman of County Carlow Historical and Archeological Society and Brian Cleary, chairman of the Robert Emmet commemoration committee delivered orations at the commemoration.’
‘These self-chosen culture leaders should go around the country, giving lucid but forceful orations, educating the people about the great qualities of their culture and creating a robust cultural consciousness in the majority.’
‘Despite their differences, the two men did not become enemies; they respected each other's research, and in 1832 Geoffroy gave one of the orations at Cuvier's funeral.’
‘Instead of persisting with mindless fashion parades exhibiting Western attires, there were orations, dances, dramas that showcased the rich cultural heritage of our country.’
‘By the time I got back to Palmer's suite, his press secretary Karren Beanland, with whom there had been many prior discussions about the Prime Minister's orations, was coming out holding my tape recorder.’
‘It would be easy to dismiss these frightful orations as the rantings of frustrated clergymen.’
‘I want to suggest that in the case of his funeral orations, Derrida writes from within a rhetorical tradition that sometimes includes meaning or signification in its persuasive aims.’
‘But this contemporary silence stems from more than just humility in the face of the great orations of the past.’
‘I want to insist, however, that in the case of his funeral orations, Derrida's concern for presence and otherness is not merely theoretical.’
‘Like Cicero and Quintilian, Robinson strongly supports imitation, and he recommends as ‘good models’ the ‘still unsurpassed orations of antiquity’.’
‘These imaginary inaugural orations are, of course, complete fiction.’
‘They've done mock interviews, funeral orations, series of imagined letters from the famous person to a grandchild, or from an invented friend to the famous person.’
‘For it is not necessarily self-evident that epistles and orations function in the same way.’
‘Though it's easy to ridicule the performance element of these orations, they do act as a focus for the party and from time to time they find a kind of immortality.’
‘Set in a future-world London, a.d.3700, the novel is a fragmented fictive archive of orations, dialogues, dream-visions, and the working papers of its protagonist.’
‘Many leaders spoke at the conference, and Wright summarizes a number of their orations.’
‘Leaders improvised eloquent orations referring to the usual civic virtues.’
‘All five received their degrees from the chancellor of the university, former president, Mary Robinson, after glowing orations in Latin in a traditional ceremony which has changed little in 400 years.’
‘The orations that accompany the awarding of an honorary degree are rarely sophisticated studies in personality.’

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Lucas

‘Born in Edinburgh, he was a violinist, conductor and teacher whose compositions included operas, oratorios, songs, concertos, chamber and orchestral works.’
‘He also performed numerous songs, oratorios and cantatas.’
‘She has performed in many operas, operettas, musicals and oratorios.’
‘In fact, the work as a whole is more on the scale of an oratorio like Handel's Messiah than of any typical jazz recording.’
‘He was also influential in introducing Handel's oratorios to the Boston public.’
‘It is not because one had awful speakers and the other superb orators.’
‘One of the Democratic Party's greatest orators argued, ‘We are not for propagating philanthropy at the point of the bayonet.’’
‘In the years since, Atlas has carved a name for himself as one of the most eloquent orators on the sport.’
‘The miniature was a gift from the forty-year-old artist to her famous and frequent client, the orator and public servant Daniel Webster.’
‘He was a skilled orator and yet a three-hour speech (not uncommon) left his listeners with memories of just a few sentences.’
‘A great orator and man of the theatre, Jimmy won many awards in drama festivals during the fifties and sixties, winning the best actor award on more than one occasion.’
‘Chief Seattle, a Suquamish Indian who lived on the Puget Sound outside the city that bears his name, was a skilled diplomat and a great orator.’
‘At that time the name was given to the professional orators, who appeared in public with great pomp and delivered declamations either prepared beforehand or improvised on the spot.’
‘An attractive orator and accomplished trial lawyer, Edwards can now effectively compete for the nomination.’
‘Both were highly effective orators, but with markedly different techniques.’
‘Those French orators engaged in the real matters of public concern address the king and the great nobles either from the pulpit or in parliament.’
‘James Dillon in his heyday was about the only orator of modern times to match such eloquence.’
‘The eloquent orator far prefers to work from a few scribbled notes rather than stick to a pre-prepared speech.’
‘At the UN, it doesn't matter whether you speak only French and the orator is waxing eloquent in Chinese.’
‘Lecturing to the packed Images Theatre and in a subsequent on-stage interview with the Peak, he showed himself to be a skilled orator as he challenged prevailing ideology.’
‘They were skilled orators, inspired and inspiring interpreters of scripture, and miracle workers.’
‘Lincoln was a skilled orator, brilliant at fashioning American constitutionalism into a rhetorical sword that could save the Union.’
‘Public speeches by master orators were also very popular as a performing art.’
‘The prophet is a speaker, an orator, a preacher.’
‘Instead, in the form of a symposium with other orators, he elaborates on the qualities of an effective speaker and an effective speech.’

-

Lucas

‘The latter date commemorates the day King gave his famous ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, easily one of the greatest examples of oratory in American history.’
‘Crowds delighted in speeches filled with double talk ridiculing the pompous, bombastic oratory that characterized familiar memorial rituals.’
‘Although identified as a fierce partisan, he received high marks from members of both political parties for his hard work, reasonableness, and eloquent oratory.’
‘Now they could make up their own minds about the value of what the Prophet exemplified in his lifestyle and communicated with his brilliant oratory.’
‘His fervent soap-box oratory, rhetorical literary style, and experience as secretary of the Timber Workers Union brought a growing reputation.’
‘Listen, I've had long conversations with him and Brown separately, and their level of rhetoric and oratory rises when they talk about this.’
‘Aboriginal cultures also valued fine oratory and the languages were, and are, often poetic, inventive and witty.’
‘Recently, however, a group of researchers led by James Cone has challenged this view, arguing that King's theology and oratory sprang mainly from his boyhood training at Ebenezer Church.’
‘A cultural turn-around is usually marked by emotive rhetoric, sometimes even dazzling oratory.’
‘Contrary to popular belief, simple communication skills and good manners are more important than great oratory.’
‘Each of these bands was headed by both a war leader and a civil leader, the former chosen because of his reputation as a warrior, and the later chosen because of his eloquent oratory.’
‘Parallels between persuasive oratory and eloquent musical performance are evident, but the precise relationship of music to rhetoric has often been unclear.’
‘Elected to many political positions, including his appointment as mayor of Bogotá, Gaitán had captivated the country with his dynamic oratory and articulation of social problems.’
‘The contemporary newspapers, even those opposed to George's policies, almost entirely agreed in paying tribute to his remarkable oratory and formidable rhetorical skills.’
‘In her public oratory and in letters to the newspapers, she urges people to sign the petition, offering them a voice in Congress even if laws and practices deny them an official vote on who serves in Congress.’
‘The text of Chief Seattle's monologue has frequently appeared in anthologies of American Indian literature and oratory, but most do not identify its source.’
‘Eloquent oratory has long been an integral part of the Samoan culture.’
‘Such oratory may offer proof that its subject is praiseworthy or blameworthy, but does not usually offer arguments for the values that underlie the speech.’
‘But at Davos, Chambers's persuasive oratory stole the show.’
‘These activities are spontaneous forms of heightened spoken language, much closer to casual speech than the older oratory.’

-

Lucas

‘Robinson divides Forensic Oratory into two parts, first discussing oratory in general and then exploring forensic oratory in particular.’
‘Formal oratory notwithstanding, everyday speech is, on the other hand, largely informal and typically spontaneous.’
‘This is the way public meetings used to be when oratory mattered and they're surely not just there because they like the idea of not having to pay tuition fees.’
‘And certainly, the two speeches delivered by Brutus and Antonius at the funeral are classics in oratory.’
‘‘By any standards public oratory is appalling’, claimed Donald Horne in The Lucky Country.’
‘There are various different schools of public oratory.’
‘Rhetoric can be described as the art of composition, while oratory was the art of public speaking.’
‘They rank among the plainest final words in the history of oratory, yet they kindled great expectations.’
‘Originally a term referring to the skills associated with public oratory, ‘rhetoric’ has come to mean the art of verbal discourse.’
‘A celebrated public speaker, he established the tradition of commemorative oratory in the United States.’
‘Pointing out that his discourse is crafted not only for a festive display, but also for a particular historical moment, Isocrates affirms the legitimacy of oratory as a vehicle of political deliberation.’
‘Allen's primary intention, we can see, has been to explicate the art of oratory not for its own sake, but as a tool of social justice in general and of abolition.’
‘While men might employ poetry or oratory to criticize women, women compose and sing songs about men.’
‘Theology and history predominate; oratory, romance, philosophy, science, medicine, and lexicography also come within its scope.’
‘The collection is enjoyable, and one can learn a fair bit about Thatcher herself, recent British political history, and oratory generally from listening.’
‘Fred Turner was a gifted speaker, attracted to books and public oratory.’
‘It is instructive that Isocrates uses oral metaphors to describe the role of poetry and oratory in cultural reproduction and to convey the idea of an education he himself professes.’
‘In political oratory and pedagogy, as in the novel, the authority of displayed deliberation was pervasive.’
‘On the contrary, the art of persuasion, of which oratory is one branch, can never be much cultivated except in a free society.’
‘Even by the dismal standards of modern political oratory, it was desperate stuff.’

-

Lucas

‘The southern parts are within the orbit of London and discharge commuters into Euston, St Pancras, King's Cross, and Liverpool Street.’
‘He claims that liberal opinions on these matters fall within the orbit of evangelical Christianity, but makes very little reference to recent books that refute these false notions.’
‘It should not be concluded from this that Norman and Plantagenet kings were reluctant to see the orbit of their influence enlarged.’
‘In fact, this sense of daring separates him from many creative artists, both within the Hollywood sphere and the indie orbit.’
‘Affable by nature, Wallace moves from the stage to the bar and back again, using words of thanks and admiration to chat up everyone within his orbit.’
‘I do not think there is one person within his orbit who was not the beneficiary of his wisdom, encouragement, and generosity.’
‘He may have come within the orbit of the literary set of which Jonson had been the leader.’
‘It may be moving closer to the orbit of Western Europe, but there are still enormous obstacles to overcome.’
‘Nunney is within commuting distance of Bath and Bristol and within the orbit of Londoners seeking weekend retreats.’
‘In a different orbit altogether are forthcoming books by two authors also associated with the pop business.’
‘She appeared to be one of these people who think they know everything worth knowing, and who deem it their duty to enlighten all who come within their orbit.’
‘In the 1980s and 90s, the emergence of centers within the orbit of the seminary has accented new mission challenges.’
‘The book opens with cosmopolitan collecting activities of noble families in the orbit of the Russian court.’
‘The difficulty is in making the concept both concrete and yet expansive enough to include everyone who ought to fall within our orbit of concern.’
‘The best known Marxist economists outside the orbit of official Communism found it all but impossible to come to terms with what was happening.’
‘It places any criticism of government policy in the orbit of illegal activity.’
‘What the high court has done, however, is to at least bring the torturers within the orbit of the law, subject to some form of accountability and judicial restraint.’
‘Commenting on the polls is not within the orbit of this bill.’
‘Second, it is symptomatic that purposeful Baptist theological reflection has emerged outside the Baptist orbit.’
‘To direct one's thoughts against someone is to remain within their orbit.’

-

Lucas

‘The noise had sent the stadium into orbit and Dublin just needed another score or two to fix Tyrone with a stare and make them think that losing was a possibility.’
‘If you are an aficionado of Spanish wines, the list here will send you into orbit.’
‘Any compliment she would give him in the past would send him into orbit.’
‘We just about went into orbit when they came up with a better figure than ours.’
Militaries that can not afford communications satellites of their own can lease transponders on the satellites orbited by other countries, and some - like Australia - have already done so.’
‘If the Soviets could orbit Sputnik, who was to say that they were not proceeding to develop the capability for a space-based missile attack?’

-

Lucas

‘‘When the salmon go, the eagles will go, and the orcas will, too,’ Gammon cautions.’
‘Adult orcas have been seen encouraging their young, pushing them onto a ‘practice’ beach where no seals are present.’
‘If you look at dolphins, orcas, and blue whales, all fully aquatic animals, you would have a hard time imagining them walking on land.’
‘But Balcomb said he is fighting, nonetheless, to prove that sonar is dangerous to orcas too.’
‘Then potential menace turned to pure joy as two more orcas joined the first and together they porpoised toward the setting sun.’
‘Unlike other mammals, newborn dolphins and orcas stay active 24/7 during first months of development’
‘The area is home to orcas, dolphins, and a wealth of other marine mammals and birds.’
‘Five river dolphin species and 34 oceanic species have been identified, including the orca and melon-headed and pilot whales.’
‘Most common are bears, orcas, sea lions, seals, otters, eagles, terns and cormorants.’
‘Once those prey dwindled, orcas would settle for the smaller fur seals and aggressive sea lions.’
‘The orcas prey on the indigenous Californian sea lions, which are permanent residents off the smaller islands such as Los Islotes, off the remotest corner of Espiritu Santo.’
‘The release of 195 decibels into this key waterway used by orcas, porpoises, seals, and other marine mammals was followed by an increase in strandings.’
‘The prime suspect is a predator new to the otter: the orca.’
‘We take cups of coffee onto the deck to view humpback whales and pods of orcas.’
‘Salmon is critical to the diets of grizzly bears and orcas, the researcher stated.’
‘The orcas - like those made famous by the film Free Willy - usually move in large family pods around the North Atlantic, visiting America, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Scotland on their long trek.’
‘Since 1976, whale expert Ken Balcomb has led what is perhaps the longest running study on killer whales, or orcas.’
‘We jump aboard and head out full-throttle until we see a pod of orcas running down a Pacific white-sided dolphin.’
‘That forced orcas, or killer whales, which normally feed on seals and sea lions, to approach the coast and eat the sea otters.’
‘Sharks have not displayed the intelligence that dolphins, orcas or even whales have.’

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Lucas

‘Another door at the far end led into the orchestra pit under the stage.’
‘Simply put, the system divides the orchestra pit into ten acoustical zones and the stage into fourteen, each governed by a directional microphone.’
‘Next week's production of The Wizard Of Oz will involve more than 100 participants, aged seven to 21, on stage and backstage and in the orchestra pit.’
‘As part of the refurbishment, a new orchestra pit, accommodating up to 60 musicians, has been created, along with the construction of a new backstage block, incorporating dressing rooms, and an increase in the height of the flytower.’
‘This could be lowered for an orchestra pit; raised to match the floor level just in front of the stage, where it could support three rows of seating; or raised further to the stage's level, increasing its frontal floor area.’
‘He led the foursome to seats in the balcony above the orchestra pit - the perfect place to sit and see and hear everything.’
‘Six principal string players (two violins, two violas, and two cellos) had left their places in the orchestra pit and now took their seats on the stage for the overture.’
‘Word is Adams fell nearly six feet into the orchestra pit at Liverpool's Royal Court theatre, badly fracturing his wrist, injuring his leg and cutting his lip.’
‘This evening, though, Davis will make his debut in the orchestra pit at Richard Wagner's Bayreuth festival theatre in Bavaria, conducting the composer's 1850 work, Lohengrin.’
‘There is even an orchestra pit, quite unusual for auditoriums at home.’
‘During an orchestra rehearsal for New York City Ballet, Christopher Wheeldon rushes onto the stage from the audience, nimbly maneuvering over a narrow strip between the proscenium and the orchestra pit.’
‘‘There is a give-and-take between what happens on stage and what happens in the orchestra pit,’ he added.’
‘He's been keeping her in the orchestra pit under the stage all this time.’
‘The fact that neither hall has an orchestra pit created unique problems of stagecraft for the directors.’
‘Suddenly, the front wheel that was supporting the castle went skidding across the stage and landed in the orchestra pit.’
‘The theater also contains a full fly tower and is outfitted with a control suite, catwalks, spotlights, and an orchestra pit.’
‘The current facility, a traditional black-box theater in Alice Pratt Brown Hall, accommodates only 200 and has a small orchestra pit and stage.’
‘This corresponded to the front of the orchestra pit.’
‘And the orchestra pit at the Jamshed Bhabha Theatre was being used for the first time.’
‘A special focus on the performing arts is evidenced in the public wing of the building, which includes a 1030-seat auditorium with a recessed orchestra pit and full fly loft.’

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Lucas

‘My father believed there would be more openings for a violin player in an orchestra because the string section was bigger than any other.’
‘Sibelius Instruments is a unique, interactive encyclopedia of instruments, bands, orchestras and ensembles.’
‘As the dark tones of the opening gave way to the big tunes and the triumphant outbursts of brass and percussion the orchestra sounded confident and technically in control of Dvorak's patriotic music.’
‘The competition is open to all brass players under the age of 21, of Grade 8 or equivalent standard, who play regularly with a brass or wind band or orchestra.’
‘The scoring is for a simple classical orchestra, strings, double woodwind, four horns and two trumpets.’
‘Conklin has performed as a violin soloist with numerous orchestras including the Louisville, Nashville and Berlin Symphony Orchestras.’
‘Born in China, Jennifer is a member of the Columbus Symphony Cadet orchestra and is principal flutist at Jones Middle School.’
‘Calfe also is active in her high school marching, concert and jazz bands, orchestra and percussion ensemble.’
‘The brass section of an orchestra typically consists of trumpets, horns, trombones, and tubas.’
‘He also studied the violin with Felix Niolan, concert-master of the Opéra orchestra.’
‘With a thriving orchestra, wind-band, ensembles and choirs, and a full range of instrument lessons on offer, music is well represented in the school.’
‘The first half of the programme will consist of the choir and orchestra performing Schubert's Mass in G, for which they will be joined by soprano Evelyn Nicholson.’
‘It supports a concert choir, a concert band and an orchestra.’
‘They are joined by anything from sweeping strings to a full orchestra with brass and a mass of subtle percussion.’
‘The orchestra was founded in 1951 by eight soloists from the most highly respected Viennese orchestras and chamber music ensembles.’
‘Numbering more than 15,000, Boosey publications are a staple for serious musicians of all instruments, and for concert bands, orchestras and choirs.’
‘The result is not the sound of a piano but the sound of a whole percussion orchestra.’
‘It is as if the string section of the orchestra suddenly decided to play its own music, disregarding everyone else.’
‘The orchestra's brass section will open each concert with A Fanfare For The Ancient Kingdom, a piece composed in conjunction with local schools.’
‘Sandström uses a large orchestra, including many percussion instruments and an organ.’

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Lucas

‘In my continuing education I learned that Mendelssohn orchestrated the scherzo of his octet.’
‘It's well co-ordinated and the instrumentation is brilliantly orchestrated.’
‘It was set to five piano pieces orchestrated by Glazunov and unlike the final version was Polish rather than Romantic in character.’
‘Among its new product features is Arrange, a function enabling the use of artificial intelligence to arrange and orchestrate music automatically.’
‘At least, listening to his account, a composer would probably know how to go about orchestrating the work.’
‘And yet even here Gould does not merely orchestrate hymns.’
‘George's desires are subsequently orchestrated with terrifying precision.’
‘Almost every call was less about chatting than about arranging and orchestrating the logistics of family and home life.’
‘Marian Maloney Higgins, head of the hairdressing college is orchestrating the hair style element of the show.’
‘Phoenix needs its maestro to orchestrate its attack, especially with Cassell on the other side.’
‘And they have a slightly alternative soundtrack to which they orchestrate their moves.’
‘To boost revenue, Pyott is orchestrating a major shift in the company's product mix.’
‘Rozema skillfully orchestrates all of these elements together, and the result is a richly textured, entertaining and impressive debut.’
‘Busby was originally accused of orchestrating a hoax letter-bomb campaign against English people living in Scotland in the mid-1990s.’
‘Irwin is credited with orchestrating the successful campaign last year that returned Marolt to office after a four-year hiatus.’
‘The combatants so far proved incapable of ending the civil war, working toward rebuilding the civic and state institutions and orchestrating a comprehensive plan for rehabilitation.’
‘Remember that the Divine has a keen sense of rhythm in helping to orchestrate your life.’
‘It's a bit disturbing that I was laughing hysterically at a leader who's orchestrating the death of thousands, including our own people.’
‘Nick's maid, Betty Pearce, was the one who had helped him orchestrate his plans in the first place, and she was now to be Nora's personal attendant.’
‘The organisation had been poised to benefit from a massive campaign orchestrated by the Daily Record.’
‘There are a number of firms in Washington whose business it is to orchestrate phony letter writing campaigns on behalf of pricey clients.’
‘He also orchestrates the hourlong setup, plus the sound check and break down.’
‘Edmunds has orchestrated several campaigns for Mr Baildon but this one has a new flavour.’
‘Both leaders played a major part in orchestrating the EU's pledge at the Lisbon summit in March to copy US-style labour market flexibility.’
‘The chairman of a credit union that fired its two managers for misconduct has been accused of orchestrating a campaign to blacken their names.’
‘The Federal Government denies it's been orchestrating a smear campaign.’

-

Lucas

‘Orchestration is comprised of three pillars: asynchronous conversations, flow coordination, and exception management.’
‘This effort required the careful orchestration of men, machines, and supplies.’
‘It gives you a much greater appreciation for the orchestration of the whole team required for a play to go smoothly.’
‘The festival will include the high-tech wizardry of Decoufle, known for his orchestration of the ceremonies of the 1992 Winter Olympics in Albertville, France.’
‘Others are grander orchestrations of images, information and observations.’
‘The funeral is a showy affair, and its orchestrations are designed mainly for the benefit of the townspeople.’
‘Despite the precision involved, building a home is an art that requires the careful orchestration of the various trades involved.’
‘The people who are running the convention have created four days of acute orchestration designed to get maximum response.’
‘Leigh's skilful orchestration of character and narrative was confidently reasserted in his drama 'Grown-Ups'.’
‘He was daring and intelligent, produced huge plays and scared defenses with his orchestration of the offense.’
‘Three of the works have been orchestrated by Panula himself to good effect.’
‘He originally scored it for electronic sound and Andy Meyers orchestrated it two months ago.’
‘I spent more time orchestrating my next score than looking for work.’
‘There is no doubt that the singing and the rest of the score are beautifully performed and orchestrated.’
‘I believe Bloch also orchestrated it, and it shows up once in a blue moon on concert programs.’
‘Two years later, ten weeks before his death, Mozart told his wife he was orchestrating the rondo finale for his friend Anton’
‘Gloria is not only a multi-instrumentalist (she plays violin and piano) but she also arranges and orchestrates all the music of Rua.’
‘Barber's skill in assembling and orchestrating this 17-minute work is beyond question.’
‘It is a way of gauging the sophistication with which Newman evoked specific times and places when he orchestrated and arranged the finished tracks.’
‘Now the question is whether Scheid can orchestrate a winning score for Janus.’
‘And, if Webern could orchestrate Bach, then why not let Poppen orchestrate Webern?’
‘RUA are Liz Madden and Gloria Mulhall who compose, arrange, orchestrate, produce and perform all their own music.’
‘Later, he orchestrated the piece which is the one we hear in this recording.’
‘What it does have is a collection of pop songs that are decently orchestrated and fleshed out with dense instrumentation.’

-

Lucas

‘It struck me that many West Virginians delighted in telling stories of what happened to their lives the moment the court ordained desegregation.’
‘She had run from the devastation she had caused and from her brethren, who pursued her to bring her to justice ordained by the council.’
‘Apparently, it was ordained that two brothers could not be so close, and Paddy was transferred.’
‘In 1398, it was ordained that his feast-day was to be kept by every church in the Province of Canterbury.’
‘The great Classical works depend in part on the mastery of orchestration they display.’
‘It has also been continuously reorchestrated, Adam's original orchestration having long since been lost.’
‘Here the focus is on rhythm, phrasing and orchestration.’
‘Not that its music isn't well-crafted and charming: indeed, it features several attractive themes and gorgeous orchestration.’
‘Themes could be presented in different rhythms or metres, or with different orchestrations, or with slight changes in melody.’
‘Full of allusions and caricatural aspects, the piece is challenging, but its rich and luscious orchestration more than makes up for its complexities.’
‘There is plenty of forward melodic motion, clear textures, and fine orchestration.’
‘He had a unique style and he was a master of orchestration, particularly for the steelband.’
‘Visitors can search using a variety of options including keyword, tempo, style, composer and orchestration, just to name a few.’
‘You would want something more sophisticated for a concert performance, but here it complements Day's style and minimal orchestrations.’
‘Aren't all romantic concertos about the individual asserting herself against powerful orchestrations?’

-

Lucas

‘Those presented might then be put to the ordeal to ascertain their guilt or innocence.’
‘As a result, ordeals were replaced by trials by juries.’
‘If he still maintained his innocence, he was able to decide between two ordeals: water or iron.’
‘He was ordained to the priesthood in 1987 by Dublin auxiliary Bishop Des Williams.’
‘In 1959 Andrew was ordained as a minister and has served the Lord faithfully in different ministries, pastoring churches in Mexico and Texas.’
‘He was finally ordained as a Presbyterian minister after moving to Utica, New York, in 1822 to become principal of a school.’
‘He was ordained as a diocesan priest in the year 1984.’
‘While in Golden, he was ordained an Episcopal minister and later served residents in Colorado's mining camps during his scientific excursions.’
‘In 1948 Dad was ordained a minister in the Chortitzer Mennonite Church and served until 1981, when he retired from that service.’
‘Born in Armagh, he was ordained as a Presbyterian minister in 1946, and established the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster in 1951.’
‘He was ordained as a Lutheran minister in 1819 and later entered the Presbyterian ministry.’
‘At 23, Jackson was ordained as a minister in the African Zionist church, while learning wood-carving from his father.’
‘Groves believed there was no need for him to be ordained to minister the Word of God.’
‘John Paul traces his pastoral concern for the young back to his work with them soon after he was ordained a priest.’
‘In 1655, with a degree from Padua, he was ordained to the priesthood.’
‘He was ordained a minister two years ago and is pastor of Perfecting Faith Church in Freeport, New York, which has more than 400 members.’
‘In 1848 Newman went to Rome where he was ordained to the priesthood, then founded the Oratory at Birmingham in 1848.’
‘The churches responded in a variety of ways - by merging parishes, by abandoning unwanted churches, by institutional amalgamations, and by ordaining women ministers and priests.’
‘He was ordained a minister of the Church of Scotland by the Presbytery of Edinburgh in 1936.’
‘In 1803, he was ordained minister of the Federal Street Church (now the Arlington Street Church) in Boston.’
‘At some point along the way he was ordained as a Pentecostal minister.’
‘In 1932, he was ordained as a minister and married in 1933.’
‘He was ordained a Roman Catholic priest in 1946, and is attached to the diocese of Varanasi in India.’

-

Lucas

‘How can orderliness and organization be a method to achieve spirituality?’
‘Despite the theoretical orderliness of the hierarchy, extraordinarily complex and difficult relationships have evolved within many of the ministries.’
‘She loved Ty, but she never got his organization and orderliness.’
‘A wealthy neighborhood is characterized by orderliness, cleanliness, peace and quiet, moderation and beauty.’
‘However, public indiscipline still creates chaos, where a little patience from drivers and orderliness would solve most if not all problems of Bangalore traffic.’
‘This is the voice of Eamon's sister who dared to speak about the ordeal of her younger brother.’
‘The judge gave him credit for pleading guilty which spared the girl the ordeal of attending court.’
‘Throughout the ordeal of recent months, Darius has clearly drawn strength from his family.’
‘The ordeal of the bereaved families is a sobering reminder to ministers.’
‘Support from other abuse victims and the police had helped her to cope with the ordeal of the trial, she said.’
‘She believes young pupils should not have to go through the ordeal of a formal examination.’
‘During the trial the McNeils put their victims through the ordeal of giving evidence.’
‘All but the most ardent rodent fanciers would consider this a highly unpleasant ordeal.’
‘At least the ordeal of yet another defeat was over sooner than expected.’
‘The alternative would have been to put their children through the ordeal of a possible court case.’
‘As if the ordeal of a trial were not bad enough, he and Dolores must now face an arguably worse fate.’
‘Staff morale must be sapped by the ordeal of coping with crisis conditions day after day.’
‘The ordeal of being mugged is scary enough without being left to feel as though you're on your own and helpless.’
‘Most were more than willing to talk about the ordeal of the last few days.’
‘The boy, who was conscious throughout the ordeal, suffered fractures to his left leg and a broken nose.’
‘As a consequence he forced the families through the ordeal of the trial.’
‘Clients will have the chance to speak to others who have suffered similar ordeals.’
‘But she said Dr Williams remained in good spirits despite the ordeal of the hearing.’
‘The ordeal of one of the families, the Pancars from Turkey, began seven years before.’
‘No one experienced the ordeal of those first few years more acutely than his first wife, Linda.’

-

Lucas

‘In Banda Aceh, on the northern tip of Sumatra and a main delivery point for aid, relief centers operated out of tents and passed out boxes of supplies to orderly crowds, the report said.’
‘Would we always have been able to find an orderly set of three people?’
‘Wong said there was no chaos during the disruption of service and passengers were orderly.’
‘Inspector Mooney said the 15,000 or so people who used the camping facilities were also very orderly and they were called out to a small number of minor incidents at the site.’
‘A small, neat and orderly man, he became a journeyman tailor but lost his job when the new tailors' union went on strike in 1834.’
‘Akbar said he would allow such rallies provided they were orderly and held within the confines of the law.’
‘He was always orderly, but adventurous at the same time and believed strongly in dressing for success.’
‘One of the things that makes an orderly demonstration turn into a melee, is when people aren't orderly, and when the police actually fear a melee.’
‘Any neat and orderly person would consider it a disaster, but King Dordig was no such person.’
‘You are methodical and orderly, solving problems logically, and wasting little time on superficial matters.’
‘They are orderly, diligent and respectable within their own conventions, as in his two pictures of peasant weddings.’
‘Once help arrived, people would have been orderly.’
‘I'm not an orderly person in the lab, and it doesn't look like that's going to change.’
‘He was so orderly and disciplined that it didn't make sense for him to not be right on time.’
‘He was a very neat and orderly person and although he enjoyed romping about, he normally dressed impeccably.’
‘Another whose calls I always welcomed was a young civil servant in the Board of Trade, an orderly man whose remarks and replies were brief and to the point.’
‘But she does nevertheless enjoy much respect for representing a rather stiff, formal, orderly Britain that many people are sad to have lost.’
‘Despite what the wad of gum always stuck between Dee's teeth might tell a person about her, Dee was one of the cleanest and mostly orderly people I've ever met.’
‘These, then, enabled the people to be orderly and disciplined, even selfless, and lead a peaceful existence.’
‘Since they didn't say so and only asked people to be orderly, it can be taken that this march will be allowed.’

-

Lucas

‘Who came up with the fatuous idea of getting drunken hooligans to form orderly queues at cash points across Britain?’
‘This crystalline structure is an orderly arrangement of ions known as a crystal lattice.’
‘Anyone interested should form an orderly queue somewhere that won't get in the way of everybody else.’
‘Yes girls, you should be forming an orderly queue.’
‘Rather, you should make suitable arrangements to ensure an orderly transition, when this is appropriate.’
‘Reducing the example to just two balls would make the odds of an orderly arrangement occurring more likely.’
‘Many common solids are crystalline, which means that their molecules are arranged in an orderly pattern that resembles a three-dimensional grid.’
‘An x-ray crystallographic picture of quartz would show atoms arranged in an orderly, periodic sequence.’
‘Our hope is that the new management will maintain order and have minibus drivers queue in an orderly fashion for their passengers.’
‘I can arrange them in an logical and orderly fashion in my mind.’
‘The cell spaces are also orderly in their arrangement, unlike typical periosteal tissue.’
‘This is helped by the orderly arrangement of The Square and the very good developments of roadside verges on the approach roads.’
‘The queues to honour the Queen Mother's death were good-natured and there can hardly have been a more thoroughly British expression of sympathy than the orderly queue.’
‘An asexual adult colony is made up of just two cell types arranged in an orderly pattern.’
‘When I passed through Williton on my way to the railway station in Taunton early this afternoon the Shell garage was the focus of an orderly queue of vehicles waiting in line for their turn at the pumps.’
‘Quasicrystals are unusual metallic alloys whose atoms are arranged in orderly patterns that are not quite crystalline.’
‘Thoughts and perceptions must be arranged in an orderly sequence of ideas.’
‘If the internal structure is formed in an orderly crystal arrangement, then the breaks will occur along the planes of the internal crystal structure.’
‘You would have seen the six armies, arranged in orderly fashion in the huge courtyard.’
‘I want to see an orderly set of arrangements, and the Crown manager is the person who is able to focus on that.’

-

Lucas

‘Or is what CBS News is doing here just a whole different order of magnitude?’
‘When the city's homicide toll hovers in that order of magnitude, nobody gets too upset.’
‘I was bowled away by the band's performance last year, but this was a different order of magnitude.’
‘The economics of operation were therefore of a wholly different order of magnitude from the economics of operation of the slower, smaller but basically efficient older ferries.’
‘It must be in that order of magnitude because think of the billions of dollars that have been sent that way, billions.’
‘But Mont Pincon was different, the same sort of battle but of a different order of magnitude.’
‘Fifty years from now, the biological intelligence of humanity will still be at that same order of magnitude.’
‘We've never faced a disaster of this nature or order of magnitude, but yes, I think we're beginning to understand what we need.’
‘Nonetheless, with costs of that order of magnitude, one might imagine that such a venture would be solely within the domain of governments.’
‘In other theatres of operation, statistics for military losses were of an order of magnitude that had been registered in the First World War.’
‘But what takes it into a different order of magnitude is his decision to keep his shares in the family - until forced, last night, to sell them.’
‘We are dealing with a different order of magnitude of threat.’
‘I think it is in a different order of magnitude to that of Smith and Carlos back then.’
‘‘It's a different order of magnitude,’ says Chronos.’
‘Considerations of this order of magnitude must not be brushed aside.’

-

Lucas

‘All 50 states have child-protection ordinances mandating that professionals who come in contact with children report cases of suspected abuse to the local child protective services agency.’
‘The Democrats had to compromise on the scope to make the ordinance workable, because the government would have dropped the ordinance, Lee said.’
‘Charles's household ordinances were intended to re-introduce order and decorum into court life by re-establishing the etiquette of Henry VIII's time.’
‘The ordinance will regulate the services of water supply companies throughout the country.’
‘Obey these instructions as a lasting ordinance for you and your descendants.’
‘Wildfires that scorched the West have emphasized the need for better road access for fire-fighting equipment; new ordinances are mandating wider roads with better turnarounds.’
‘The ordinance also provides rules for the registration of foreign students, and for control and co-ordination of tour operator contracts.’
‘It also canceled a 1997 ordinance regulating the state's credit and loan agreements.’
‘When Bose became the vice-chancellor in June 2001, he found that the institution had flouted basic rules in its ordinance to give affiliation to about 40 institutions across the country.’
‘Bulgarian producers will get preference in public procurement tenders, and this will be regulated by a Cabinet ordinance.’
‘Initially, the Government ordinance was received with mixed feelings by the public, and coldly by the Association of Hotel and Restaurant Owners, which argued that the regulations would ruin their businesses.’
‘The details regarding the narrow limits that exist on the right to use these rooms and tight controls over them have since been regulated in special state government ordinances in order to prevent misuse.’
‘The ordinance also says government authorities cannot ‘request forced labor.’’
‘I asked the supervising officer for the exact ordinance but he couldn't recall it.’
‘"The government has the intention to draft an ordinance regulating human reproductive technology in the future, and this will also regulate the use of stem cells, " the spokeswoman said.’
‘The Cabinet approved an ordinance regulating the inspections connected to direct control of the protection of classified information.’
‘The ordinances are important because they will make the environment more predictable for investors and will enhance the chances for stable development of the sector, said Deputy Prime Minister and Economy Minister Lydia Shuleva.’
‘Wilson finally ordered his employees to stop enforcing the ordinance.’
‘The government is apparently now contemplating bringing into force an ordinance which makes it mandatory for any channel in India to share feed of events of national interest with him.’
‘If it could rule by ordinances alone, it would.’

-

Lucas

‘Employers providing health insurance under municipal living-wage ordinances have been allowed to form insurance-buyer pools.’
‘For instance, it is clear that where police enforce municipal ordinances against unlawful assembly, civil disturbance and harassment, anti-abortion protestors move to another location.’
‘Not surprisingly, last Friday's Minneapolis City Council meeting was dominated by the smoking ban ordinance, which burned up nearly two hours of debate.’
‘The city recently had passed an ordinance that banned smoking in all restaurants, and he was counting down the seconds until he had to extinguish that last cigarette.’
‘However, be warned that there are some states that prohibits the use of helmet speakers, thus, be aware first of your municipal laws or ordinances.’
‘I'm pretty sure it violates a bylaw or an ordinance or something.’
‘The South Hills municipality passed an ordinance this month banning smoking in public places for those under age 18.’
‘A proposed ordinance would ban ‘loitering’ on median strips; violators would be subject to a $500 fine and six months in jail.’
‘Other regulations were imposed by municipal ordinances.’
‘Los Angeles followed suit in 1998, and dozens of cities have now passed ordinances regulating their use in residential areas.’
‘Police representatives insisted that it was the responsibility of escorts to ensure they knew and abided by municipal, provincial and federal laws, ordinances and bylaws.’
‘The two of them spoke in a droning monotone, as if talking about municipal zoning ordinances.’
‘City governments passed tongue-in-cheek ordinances prohibiting Skylab from entering the municipal limits, or inviting it into the town, depending on the mood they were in.’
‘In Tucson, where astronomy is big business, legislators enacted an ordinance that permits lights at night to shine only in a part of the spectrum that is easily filtered out by equipment on telescopes.’
‘Something you may wish to consider, perhaps in a follow-up article, is the effect of municipal weed ordinances.’
‘We also have laws and ordinances defining sanitation standards and others prohibiting disturbance of the public peace.’
‘The city passed an ordinance that regulated open-air roasting and stipulated the use of stepped-up technology to abate the pollution.’
‘I will be checking on the city ordinances to see what exactly the rules are - they shouldn't be any different than for a family reunion or company picnic.’
‘Before 1840 municipal ordinances limited horse-drawn freight to a relatively small number of licensed carters whose prices were fixed by law.’
‘Illegal disposal of solid waste is a violation of a city ordinance.’

-

Lucas

‘So this stone was monumental in its very ordinariness.’
‘It's about the innocent ordinariness of the victims.’
‘Eventually, ordinariness takes over everything.’
‘The ordinariness of a professional writer is rendered extraordinary by the strict discipline of a word culture that engulfs her or him, without and within.’
‘The family in question is really quite ordinary, nothing special, but it's exactly that ordinariness that makes the film warm and comforting.’
‘But ordinarily it is best to just put everything in one book.’
‘Things that would ordinarily be classified as bad practice usually go unnoticed.’
‘This was considered to be a breakthrough step because some of those legislators are not ordinarily permitted to enter China.’
‘This is a party at the beginning of the season here in Martha's Vineyard, and ordinarily Kay would be here.’
‘The Canada Elections Act says a person must vote in the riding where he or she ordinarily resides and not where mail is delivered.’
‘You have to be nice to people who you ordinarily wouldn't say hello to because you need money to run a campaign.’
‘From what I understand you to be saying, that is not ordinarily the case.’
‘The owner or spouse of the owner must ordinarily reside in the home and must also use the home for domestic or private residential purposes.’
‘Hillsboro is not where you would ordinarily look for schools in crisis.’
‘Hypnosis merely helps them to lift inhibitions that they may, ordinarily, have against performing in public.’
‘Now, this ordinarily wouldn't be a problem as I have a bus pass.’
‘This makes them considerably less expensive for a house-hunter who ordinarily would have to pay for a site.’
‘A book echoing this thesis wouldn't ordinarily be required reading for a sports fan or anyone else.’
‘People who might ordinarily be overlooked typically have a voice in our discussions.’
‘It was also delivered to another address where the person is believed to ordinarily reside.’
‘Well, this president has emerged as a much more polarizing figure in time of war than we're ordinarily used to.’
‘So the world must ordinarily appear to us in such a way that we can accept these principles.’
‘Although this would ordinarily have me heading for the hills, there is more than enough strangeness and humour to balance it out.’
‘She said the patients who would most be affected were those who, before the walk-in centre opened, would ordinarily see their GPs.’
‘Maintenance staff ordinarily clean up the litter, and it's back to life as usual.’

-

Lucas

‘The costs ordered to be paid should not in the ordinary way be grossly disproportionate to the fine.’
‘The claimant concedes that in the ordinary way a company cannot recover by way of costs any payment for the time of its employees engaged in investigating or prosecuting its claim.’
‘Now, as far as time for the notice of appeal is concerned, in the ordinary way, that time will run from the date I make the order, unless time is extended.’
‘I wanted to say, in the ordinary way, it should be practicable.’
‘In those circumstances the policy will, at any rate in the ordinary way, be conclusive evidence of the contract unless and until it has been rectified; the slip cannot be used to add to, explain or contradict the meaning of the policy.’
‘It is in the ordinary way the business of the prosecution to be ready.’
‘The first is that in the ordinary way costs follow the event.’
‘But in the ordinary way, a competent pleading, which alleges all the relevant facts in accordance with the claimant's instructions, either discloses a cause of action or it does not.’
‘The Rules state the details of immigration policy, and in doing so prescribe in effect which classes of aliens will in the ordinary way be allowed to enter the United Kingdom and which will not.’
‘Plainly individual acts of negligence will not in the ordinary way constitute a breach of this duty.’
‘Nothing seemed unusual or out of the ordinary that morning, to her eyes, at least.’
‘We're not going to do anything extravagant or anything that's out of the ordinary.’
‘This in itself is hardly out of the ordinary; in fact it is a common occurrence.’
‘I noticed the phone because it is the same model I have, but nothing seemed out of the ordinary.’
‘It is really, really strange because I haven't done anything out of the ordinary.’
‘It may not seem like anything out of the ordinary, but the album title alone suggests otherwise.’
‘It's an interesting one mainly because he's not really doing anything out of the ordinary with his weblog.’
‘Most carers insist that what they do is nothing out of the ordinary.’
‘Finding something out of the ordinary for gardeners can be tricky and some themes crop up again and again this Christmas.’
‘But this writer makes out as if angst in a political office is something out of the ordinary.’

-

Lucas

‘All the ordinary judges of the Supreme Court and the chief justice were educated in private schools.’
‘His position was more like the Pope than that of an ordinary bishop.’
‘He is the second most senior ordinary judge of the Supreme Court, having been appointed to the bench in 1999 when he returned from the European Court.’
‘Should this be the case, an ordinary judge is not allowed to disregard the national legislation but is bound to refer it to the Constitutional Court.’
‘Murphy's model was to have senior judges and ordinary judges under the one umbrella.’
‘Luxurious style, fine craftsmanship, and authentic details elevate Aladdin Resort & Casino far above the ordinary.’
‘It is their own compositions which mark out Rua as something above the ordinary.’
‘Akshaye, with his quiet presence and brooding eyes gets the chance to rise above the ordinary in a role, which I'm sure most actors would crave for.’
‘His physical skills are above ordinary and that pays off on the defensive end.’
‘The sentiments may be trite, but the graphics are often novel, demonstrating originality and computer skills above the ordinary.’
‘Mrs. Tuitt's prowess and achievement at the sport of netball is another huge claim to fame which elevates her above the ordinary.’
‘The telling of this story is not intended to suggest I have in some way been chosen, or that I own powers far above the ordinary.’
‘This is the film that has mattered most to him since he wrote and directed The Apostle, yet there is nothing here that rises above the ordinary.’
‘It did some exploration into Medea's psyche, but the narrative in general had a direct approach, which robbed the play of rising above the ordinary.’
‘He's on a par with Hitchcock for building tension and making the ordinary seem threatening.’
‘It aims to offer 1,200 teams from some 60 nations something way above the ordinary.’
‘In their place, Echenoz proposes a rhetoric of platitude, insisting upon the commonplace, the dull, the ordinary.’
‘What could have been an unfocused art movie is raised above the ordinary by Bill Murray's comic brilliance.’
‘This being a Dreamworks disc, and a ‘Special Edition’ at that, you can bet on a collection of extra material that is a cut above the ordinary.’
‘McGinley, a late developer, was especially disappointing this year and having failed to build on his 2001 breakthrough may now return forever to the ranks of the ordinary.’
‘Opulent style, fine craftsmanship, and authentic details elevate Paris Las Vegas far above the ordinary.’
‘The French fashion veteran infuses her clothes with feminine touches that lift them above the ordinary.’
‘It is Turner's lyrics that lift Arctic Monkeys above the ordinary.’
‘And finally, the sublime constantly mixes with the ordinary.’
‘At times yesterday they rose above the ordinary, and played with a lot of heart and defensive organisation.’

-

Lucas

‘Unfortunately, by ordinary consciousness I do not mean the ordinary consciousness of commonplace minds.’
‘It is a strangely ordinary evening in an extraordinary life.’
‘All are ordinary working men, except for Kenneth Pyper, an aristocratic artist turned existential nihilist who, unlike the others, seems genuinely prepared for death.’
‘It always amazed Diana at how many once ordinary, common things were now worth high dollars to collectors.’
‘But too often, Bowering chooses to write at a loping gait about prosaic, ordinary things, which can be uneventful and boring for the reader on the outside looking in.’
‘Annie Allen's another one of Brooks's very ordinary, totally undistinguished characters.’
‘I was a small boy of no more than five years old, and my younger brother was with me on a very ordinary evening.’
‘He advocated that literature should record the writer's affectionate response to ordinary phenomena and commonplace happenings.’
‘Instead of her common, ordinary brown eyes, her eyes now were completely black, except for one small glowing gold pupil in the center.’
‘He was a very ordinary nondescript man with average brown hair and build.’
‘It was bred as recently as 1852 in the Loire, probably as a table grape from Chasselas and the distinctly ordinary Muscat de Saumur, according to Galet.’
‘Imagine on top of this that you wanted, in fact, to mount an argument as to what makes certain daguerreotypes exceptional and others merely ordinary.’
‘This was another case of ordinary life being more interesting than it looked at first sight.’
‘For young readers, My Brother Martin is an exceptional story about an ordinary boy who became an extraordinary man.’
‘Neruda's faith in the power of poetry was not because he wrote thousands of verses but because his poetry held meaning for the most common and ordinary people.’
‘Simple, ordinary people don't interest Varma.’
‘What happened to me was not ordinary and average and commonplace and I reject any word that makes it appear so.’
‘In a warm-up game against South Africa, Smith made 57 and in the process made the World Cup attack look distinctly ordinary.’
‘‘The maestro is just an ordinary man except for the music, enjoying food and cherishing friendship,’ Zhang recalled.’
‘It is a common and ordinary experience to occasionally discover scratches and cuts with no memory of how they got there.’

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About Lucas:

I love studying, and most importantly, I enjoy learning English. English is my abiding passion. I adore cooking, entertaining guests, meeting friends, nature, animals, car driving. I answer your questions in English, but also in Spanish and in Italian! I am a voracious reader.

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Ask me your brilliant questions! I've come this far, so I'll keep going.