Krzysztof 'Paine'
Latest answers

Who are you voting for in the 2016 elections? If you don't mind saying.


It's said that "insanity is defined as doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results."
That certainly applies to politics; we can't keep electing the same machine politicians and expect them to perform far better than the last one who was in office. I believe that our country (our income inequality, our political divide) has come to a point where minor fixes here and there don't quite cut it. We need drastic change, and voters who desire drastic change must be willing to vote for drastically different candidates. Bernie captures that idea better than anyone else in the spotlight, as he's the only candidate that shows any potential for true political reform.

Unfortunately, I don't have enough faith in American voters to expect Bernie to win--in fact, I'm almost certain he won't. But he's getting my vote because the ideas he represents are ones that I (for the most part) feel are worth supporting. I'd like to contribute to his vote count to help show that efforts like his aren't hopeless, and that someday, in a different America, someone running on ideas like his may see their vision achieved.

(Feel free to respond if you disagree, but don't expect me to enter a political debate. I'm just responding to a question regarding my opinion on the matter.)

If you know of how to remove the watermark from pictures, why does your profile picture still have watermarks?

Because of sheer laziness, and a lack of free time.

Do you believe in love at first sight?

Only with ties, and wristwatches. People, on the other hand, take time.

How are you doing? How's your back? Did anything interesting happen to you recently?

I'm fine, and life's great. In fact, it's never been better; I can't think of any problems worth mentioning, and it's been a while since that was last the case.

In less than forty eight hours, I'll be touring Oslo while waiting for a connecting flight to Poland, for the first proper vacation I've had in years. (I volunteered all throughout last summer break; it was a great for building connections and the benefits were well worth it, but it rendered me devoid of any actual "break" from work.)

My back injury fully healed not too long ago, and it's been months since I've had any acute back pain. There's still some muscle soreness left over from the treatment of it, but nothing that some more physical therapy won't fix.

I've recently begun reading in depth into Einstein's theory of special relativity, and it's incredibly fascinating stuff. Though not too applicable to the everyday life of the average person, for anyone who actually wishes to understand the universe, it completely uproots any preexisting ideas of how the world around them works.

Additionally, my phone repair hobby/"business" has been going quite well (re: the photo in the answer before this one); in fact, if I had to complain about something, it would be that I'm having trouble focusing my free time on anything else. It's rather ironic: in today's economy, my greatest struggle is that I've put myself in a position where making money is so easy and enjoyable that it's difficult to /not/ make it. In the time that I spend learning the basics of a new programming language via an online course, for example, I could've bought a few thousand dollars worth of phones for a few hundred, or repaired and sold hundreds' worth. Investing in your future is markedly easier when you can't easily monetize your time. I've been meaning to move onto bigger and better things, however (that is, bigger and better than a hands-on skill with a logarithmic business growth model.) While selling phones on Craigslist, I've met, among others, people who work at Tumblr, and a member of a fairly new tech startup that deals with a certain well-known cryptocurrency. I'm submitting my resume to both companies shortly, and with any luck, I'll have an intern position in at least one of them waiting for me when I return from vacation.

How many phones do you have?

A few.

What kinds of things do you have on your desk/workspace?

Phones, iPods, and tablets that I'm repairing or selling (and some cables to charge them).

Kinda random but your background is rad, where's it from?

Google Images, if I remember right.
I typed in "The Matrix wallpaper", or something along those lines (this was over two years ago) and my current background was likely the largest and/or nicest one that came up.

What is the one thing everyone is looking for?

“We are all searching for someone whose demons play well with ours.”
― Unknown

How would you describe yourself ?

With adjectives.

CS Major I assume?

return true;

What's your favorite kind of humor?

That's a tough one.

If I had to pick a single type, I'd say dry humor.
Dark, highbrow, and satirical humor are all wonderful, though.

sat score?

sat miss.

do you think its important to live your teenage years? why?

To some extent, absolutely. If I regret anything about my teenage years a decade or two from now, it'll likely be not having spent more time and effort on various social endeavors. That being said, teenage years are also ideal for learning new skills, discovering how your own mind works, identifying (and improving) your weaknesses, and otherwise bettering yourself. When viewed as an investment towards such things, not "living" your teenage years as much (in the conventional sense) is perhaps a small price to pay.

Red pill or blue pill?

Unfortunate truth, or blissful ignorance?

The former. Always.

Is love complicated? Why?

As one of my favorite quotes goes, "Love is just a chemical, no matter the origin. We give it meaning by choice."
(Bioshock's underlying wisdom is truly something to be reckoned with.)

Alternatively, read Fitzgerald's "A New Leaf". It's a very short piece, but touches on the subject quite nicely.

So you wouldn't date someone outside of your grade?

It's not that I wouldn't, but I'd be wary of it, certainly.

Do you like anyone at stuy?

I'll just go with my answer from over a year ago:

In a school of ~3,300 people, with ~900 in my own grade (of which ~400 are female...)
I'd find it legitimately difficult to not like anyone.

Why is a raven like a writing desk?

Poe sat the latter as he wrote about the former.

Besides that, I haven't a clue.

Can describe your family

Your grammar are well.

Do you believe that we have free will?

That entirely depends on how you define "free will," but by most standard and accepted definitions, no, I don't think we do. If you disagree, then consider this: Do you believe that animals have free will? How about fruit flies, amoebas, or plants? I don't think that any such organisms have free will, and thus, by extension, it would follow that humans don't, either. To argue otherwise would be to imply that humans differ from simpler organisms by something other than mere biological complexity--that is, by some spiritual or outer-worldly force. I don't believe that is the case. Rather, I consider simple organisms to be akin to machines (biological "computers", if you will.) Given the same input (environment, etc.,) they should (in theory) always return the same output. Of course, without conducting an experiment across parallel universes, there's no way to ever conclusively prove this. But, if that were true, that would mean that we, humans, are also machine, just substantially more advanced ones--an idea that I welcome with open arms. However, whatever the truth about free will may be, it lies in quantum physics (something I haven't yet learned nearly enough about.) I've heard of how the deterministic model of the universe (my personal preference, if one can have a "preferred" scientific theory,) was supposedly disproven years ago, though I'll have to learn considerably more of the subject matter before I can understand the argument against it. If I do and I find the evidence to be sufficient, I'll gladly revise my beliefs. A non-deterministic model would also necessitate the existence of true randomness--a concept I'm not particulairly happy with, but will likewise accept if proven.

Of course, take any ideas I've mentioned here with a grain of salt, as a lack of in-depth knowledge of physics forces me to assess the subject from a more philosophical standpoint, which can only go so far. I've given the topic a considerably amount of thought, however, and as such, my ideas about it are substantially more developed than I can express within's character limit. If anything I wrote here doesn't make seem to make any sense at all, such as the sudden mention of parallel universes, feel free to message me about it, and I'll explain my reasoning. what an idiotic response. you can easily use countermeasures to prevent hacks/attacks of privacy. there will always be issues, but you can't say that you have "to deal with it" and have that mentality

There will always be issues--you said so yourself. You can comfort yourself by incorporating as many antiviruses, proxies, methods of encryption, and "secure connections" as you wish, but the fact remains that if you send sensitive information over the internet, some other computer out there will have your information stored (in some shape or form.) And if someone attacks that computer and gains access to said information, there's absolutely nothing you can do--the only way to prevent that from happening is to not send that information in the first place.
So, yes: Deal with it, or don't.

are you ashamed of your actual last name?

No, certainly not. The main reason I never use it online is to maintain some small form of anonymity. Of course, anything you do online is ultimately traceable, but if a regular citizen were to search up my legal name online, they would find nothing short of a few Spectator articles. For the time being, I prefer to keep it that way.

which side do u support this world cup?

I've never followed major sports events in the past, and I don't intend to do so now.

is there really a way to find out who send emails/ask questions on ask anonymously if theyre using proxy etc?

As with most questions like this, while it's theoretically possible, the answer, for all practical intents and purposes, is "No." In order to trace an anonymous question asked through a proxy back to a specific person, you'd need access to's servers to see what their proxified IP was when asking the question, further access to the server they used as a proxy to see what their actual IP was at the time , and then access to the servers and infrastructure of their internet provider to see what name and address is linked to the person who had that particular IP on that day. If finding their identity was extremely important (say, a particular question was somehow linked to a murder investigation,) then doing all this would likely be a walk in the park for the FBI or any similar government organization. However, from an unaffiliated individual's standpoint, it's just not viable.

Do you believe in moral relativism?

Certainly. Since there's no objective "right" or "wrong", we ultimately have to define our own morals (or let other people define them for us.)


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About Krzysztof 'Paine':

Philosophy. Psychology. Technology. Satire.