Ask @CaptainBinky:

you're totally an industry figure, PZ's whole development is like the holy grail for what we'd like to do someday :) it would just be a small design brief, thanks, will message you once we get more details and you can have a look.... Oh and a question.... erm... Mad Max or Witcher 3?

<3
Mad Max or The Witcher 3? Er... both? They're both terrific. If I absolutely *had* to rank them, then I would have to place The Witcher 3 on top. But I love them both for different reasons :)

View more

What facet of designing PZ have you enjoyed working on the most? And which has proved the most troublesome? Extra points if you mention NPC's :)

The best part of any game is the part at the very beginning when you put together that initial rough design. With an alpha-funded game, the first pre-alpha release tends to follow very rapidly, so this is also the window of time when you get that excitement when you (with any luck) start seeing interest in what you're working on.
I'm not going to say that making games is "just a job", because it isn't. It's absolutely *nothing* like slogging away in a sterile office, but that said there is an aspect to games development where most of what comes *after* that initial exciting design phase is just the production of what you designed. Making the thing is less interesting than coming up with the idea for the thing.
Also, alpha-funded games can be more flexible. So those initial design plans adapt and change along the way. Rather than a hard-and-fast design document, we have something more like design guidelines. There are certain things which are set in stone - for example, being infected is incurable, but other things are flexible - such as exactly how cooking should function, or skills develop, etc.
In this respect we have the benefit of extending those fun and interesting design discussions throughout the whole of the development process.
As far as the least fun parts of development go... well I can't say I particularly enjoyed throwing away all the sprites I had done literally days after I had completed the set of the female characters in favour of switching to 3D models. But it was worth it :)

View more

Being totally cheeky here, but we're a group of final years at Bradford Uni (saw your talk a few years back) and for our final year we're allowed to find someone in the industry to make us a design brief for a game/demo to work on in the final 3 months, would there be any interest from yourself?

Firstly, if you're referring to my talk at the Bradford Animation Festival then I'm tremendously sorry - it was my first time doing a talk by myself and before mine I had seen Brian Horton and Warren Spector deliver flawlessly brilliant talks, so I was nervous as Hell and made a right pig's ear of it :D
I had slides which I totally failed to use, and notes which I totally failed to follow :D
Anyway. Your second point: Depending on the time required (the extent of the pitch, etc) and if I could think of something sufficiently interesting and practical for a 3 month project, I'd be happy to. But that said, I'm not exactly what you'd call a notable industry figure ;)

View more

What made you guys decide to make PZ more a plodding survival than a PVP action like so many other zombie games in the last few years?

OMG a question! This is exciting!
Well, the thing with PZ was back when we started (it was originally just me and Lemmy), the likes of DayZ mod were yet to release. So we didn't start making Zomboid in a climate of a bunch of zombie survival games with a heavy focus on PvP.
So it's not like we had the foresight to think there'd be a bunch of games along these lines and cleverly decided to do something different, we just designed the game the way we wanted to, and by luck, most of the subsequent zombie games were PvP focussed or more action-oriented.
Lemmy is a long-time XCOM fan - he's really into his strategy games. I love sandbox games and I've sunk a bazillion hours into various releases of The Sims. Slam those two genres together in a post zombie apocalypse setting and you get Project Zomboid. We never regarded the idea as particularly innovative or unique or requiring some clever design skills on our part. It was simply a game we wanted to make and, at that time, we didn't see it being done - not with more traditional early Romero style zombies, at least.

View more