Ask @KBeeThatsMe:

How did you get your first break into dubbing for anime?

Yayyy I'm getting questions again, lol. Okay so first of all, I was a professional actor already. I got my degree in theatre and did a lot of professional acting gigs around Houston, I took multiple voiceover workshops... I really did my homework because this is my dream. Through the craft I met other actors who work for Sentai and expressed my interest in auditioning and when an audition came along I received an invite (I'm actually not sure who mentioned my name, I talked to a lot of people). I auditioned for Emily Love and it was super fun, and ended up getting to work on Log Horizon because I guess I did something the directors liked! :)

View more

Please tell me a story. Subject doesn't matter, but do take your time if you can.

/ When I was
/ A young boy
/ My father
/ Took me into the city
/ To see a marching band--
Okay, okay, just kidding. XD Umm let's see here... One time I was in this traveling children's show called Busytown (it was based on those Richard Scarry books with the cats and the worm and the apple car, you know what I'm talking about?). So the story is about Huckle Cat trying to figure out how to make a cake for Grandma Bear's birthday (Grandma Bear isn't HIS grandma, he burns his house down, it's all very complicated), and at the end they surprise Grandma Bear with a party and the whole town shows up. I played Grandma Bear.
Well, it was a touring show and the actors were responsible for putting the set together and placing all the props beforehand and sometimes things could get a little... scrambled... when we'd travel between venues. The cake in question was made of styrofoam and very fragile so we had to keep it in the front seat of the tour van rather than in the trailer with the rest of the equipment. That meant that it was only a matter of time before we would forget to take it out of the van before a show.
One morning we were performing at an elementary school and one of the actors' parents decided to show up and bring us breakfast, which was very nice. There were all kinds of pastries and muffins and orange juice and lots of great stuff, so we were all very excited to get set up so we could eat before the show. So excited, in fact, that the cake did not make it out of the van and we started the show without realizing it. (Mind you, the cake is kind of the crux of the entire plot of this performance. It is literally all about making a cake for Grandma Bear.) When we finally did realize it, we were about 2/3 of the way into the show and there was nothing we could do. We didn't have run crew or anyone to go out to the van and get it real quick, we were just on our own, up the creek without a birthday cake. We panicked.
We wracked our brains for a solution. Do we pretend we already ate the cake? Do we tell Grandma the cake is coming later? Is the cake invisible? Well, being Grandma Bear myself, I wasn't able to stay for the brainstorming session. I had to go on so that I could be surprised at the cake that may or may not show up. I had no choice but to leave it up to my castmates.
So the scene goes on, Grandma Bear's party starts and I do my thing as normal. Then I hear Huckle Cat say "We made you a cake!" Oh boy, here it comes. What did they come up with? I turn around and to my DELIGHT and HORROR and BEWILDERMENT the actor is holding a piece of cardboard with a CINNAMON ROLL on it! Lucky for us, there was ONE pastry left over from breakfast, and they'd somehow been able to grab it before the scene. My next line was supposed to be "Ohhh, it's beautiful!" but I was so dumbfounded it came out more like "Ohhhh it'pfpfffffffffffffffffff!" I couldn't help it, I broke.
That was the first funny story I could come up with. XD Thanks for asking~

View more

Whats in the pipeline at Sentai? Asking for a friend of a friend. All information will be held in strictest confidence ;)

Really? This question I'm answering publicly will be held in strictest confidence? That's amazing! I had no idea you could control the internet like that! (No, I'm sure you're joking... at least I hope you are.) Honestly, I don't even know what comes down the pipeline, haha! All I know is what I'm currently working on and I like my job so I won't be divulging that. You'll find that to be true of everyone, actually. Hope that helps!

View more

What led to your breaking into the voice over business?

Thanks for asking! First I got my degree in theatre, moved to Texas, and I got all the acting experience I could get doing plays, film, virtual reality, lots of stuff. In the meantime I was taking voiceover workshops and learning about mic technique and things like that. Then it was network, network, network! The more acting work I did, the more people I met who worked in anime voiceover. I would always express interest and give them my card. :) I actually don't even know who put me on the list for Sentai's general auditions, but someone did (if it was you and you're reading this I LOVE YOU) and I got to audition for Emily Neves. Then the first director to call me in was Kyle Jones on Log Horizon! :D

View more

What would you consider good dialogue in your opinion?

Thanks for asking! I write dialogue in phases. First I come up with something that gets across what's being said in the translation, then I repeat it aloud in a way the character at hand would express it (like with the kind of word choice he or she would use). Next I fit it to the flaps. There's no point in starting with fitting the flaps and THEN coming up with what sounds good. It'll leave you with something really dry and uninteresting a lot of the time. Once it fits the flaps I rehearse it aloud and make sure it's easy to say. In this industry, efficiency is CRUCIAL. If the actor keeps getting tongue-tied on your line, that's time that could've been used to fine-tune the performance or try another read. So I try to make sure it "rolls off the tongue", so to speak, so that the actor can stay in character and not have to worry too much about navigating a tongue twister in their dialogue. I also (and thankfully I've been told it works) put a lot of subtle clues to character voice in my dialogue. I want the actor to know right off the bat what kind of character he or she is dealing with and what kind of voice/characterization it calls for.
So in a nutshell, I think good dialogue takes the guesswork out of the actor's job so that they can focus on their performance, and also keeps things efficient so as not to waste the time of the directors and engineers. :)

View more

Is it hard to balance the line between fan and professional?

Thanks for asking! And yeah, a little bit. Sometimes I forget I can't enter contests and stuff, or I'll want another VA to sign my copy of something and think "wait is that weird?" I've definitely been in situations where I didn't know what side of that line to stand on, but it's kind of a cool feeling knowing I have that responsibility now. Like now I get to give back to the industry I've loved for so long and I get to add to it and influence it. I wouldn't trade it for the world. <3

View more

If you had to sleep in either a giant burrito or in between two giant slices of French toast, which would you choose?

Okay, there are several factors here. Is there syrup on the French toast? What is in the burrito? How long do I have to sleep?
All things considered, I gotta say French toast, because a burrito is all-encapsulating and I would freak out from being completely closed in. At least with toast it's more of a sandwich-type deal and I can breathe. Hopefully there's no syrup though because that noise is IMPOSSIBLE to get out of hair.

View more

Are there still people out there who think that anime is created in the States? If yes, may we cut them?

Deadpool-Sama-Senpai
Awww, no cutting! I mean, my grandma thinks I actually CREATED Akame ga Kill because I wrote the script (no matter how many times I explain it), but I wouldn't let anyone CUT her!!
Now people who get mad at American companies/studios/VAs for stuff that's out of their control because they don't understand that it's not made here, that's different...
But seriously, no cutting, haha xD

View more

Any advice on creating a character voice demo when you haven't yet been cast in anything? What are directors looking for? Should you make up characters in a variety of situations and vocal ranges?

Thanks for asking! I'd say if you haven't been cast yet it's best to focus on getting the experience first. :) Many VAs get cast without a demo. I was told from a very experienced person in the business that it's better to wait and make a demo when you're ready. If you make one without having much experience (especially if you don't have a professional helping you) it probably won't come out as polished as you'd like it to. So for now, put yourself out there and audition! You will run across things that require a demo, but many opportunities are out there for people who are new and don't have the experience. You'll learn a lot that way and probably get some material for your demo down the road. Plus it'll be fun! :) As for the other questions you asked, once you do have the experience, yes, directors want to hear variety. But remember that your natural voice is more important than any crazy cartoon voices you can do, so that should be the first thing on your demo! I hope this was helpful for you; good luck!

View more

Next