Ask @SyeraMiktayee:

Why does it seem to be that, by and large, bisexual people who are in hetero relationships with cisgender partners get rejected and bullied by the rest of the LGBT community, particularly on Tumblr? Have you noticed this too?

Oh, absolutely. This kind of thing has been pretty common for years. The logic often seems to be that getting into a heterosexual relationship turns bi people straight, or proves that they were never non-straight to begin with, or gives them "straight-passing privilege" that renders their opinions and contributions in queer spaces irrelevant.

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I am really struggling writing my black main character as a white writer and it's embarrassing. One reader tells me the character is "too white" in how she acts, but I don't know what that means?

It likely means that your reader perceives your character as exhibiting too many mannerisms, interests, and behaviors typically seen in white people, and few to none that one could reasonably expect to find on a black person. If you haven't already, you might try looking into media with well-written black characters, or watch YouTube channels created by various black people to get a sense of what you might should be doing instead.

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Is it okay if one of my LGBT characters dies of suicide? I looked through your article on alternatives to character deaths, and unfortunately, none of those fit my story. I have more LGBT characters who survive and get happy endings, but I definitely don't want to do anything damaging.

You're fine! The problem is when *no* LGBT characters are allowed to get substantially happy endings. If you have other LGBT characters who get happy endings, you don't have this problem!

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(different person now) Trauma doesn't have to be near-constant angsting, though, does it, or even make the story sad like the original asker wants to avoid, right?

+2 answers in: “Sorry if I'm being annoying, but what should I actually do if I want weird stuff to happen, but no traumas because it's too angsty?”

Oops, now I'm being offensive, sorry. I am compassionate, I just don't want to write a sad story, it's nothing against the people. Think of it this way: just because I don't have anything against people with colds doesn't mean I want to write a story where someone catches a cold. It's the same deal.

You asked me for my opinion, and I gave it to you. If you don't like what I've said, you're free to disregard it and do things your way. I have nothing more to offer you now, so feel free to be on your merry way.

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+2 answers in: “Sorry if I'm being annoying, but what should I actually do if I want weird stuff to happen, but no traumas because it's too angsty?”

Is it okay to, after apologizing for someone, buy them a gift or do them a favor, not as part of the apology or to make it up to them but just to make their day a little less sucky? Your article on apologies said to avoid that kind of thing, and I know the behavior change is the important thing.

I suppose it just depends on the person. Some might appreciate it, and it can be a sign of goodwill if it's not given with an immediate expectation of it making everything better.

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I thought up a Soulmettle OC, but the thing is, he's an elf, an MEP *and* works for NMTRRA, which I'm worried is going a bit overboard.

As long as he's not OP and his story makes a reasonable amount of sense, GO FOR IT.
(Also remember that working for NMTRRA is usually a lot less glamorous than most people think, lol.)

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Why do you think there's such a stigma on mental health issues? If the stigma is based on real problems that the illness can cause to people around the one suffering, how can I portray the illness realistically in fiction without feeding into the stigma?

Based on what I've observed, a lot of it comes down to sheer ignorance. I've seen or known of many people who think that the mentally ill are simply:
--Lazy.
--Self-pitying.
--Selfish.
--Willfully disruptive.
--Demon possessed.
--Ungodly.
--"Giving in to their mental illness."
--Raised badly.
(In addition, some mentally ill people who are *also* simply just awful people feed into this misconception themselves by blaming their own bad behavior on their illnesses.)
The ignorant are often prone to thinking that there are relatively easy cures, such as:
--Punishment.
--A special diet.
--Fresh air and sunshine.
--Exercise.
--Exorcism.
--Being more devout.
--Therapeutic techniques that can make all symptoms disappear, rather than mitigate them or teach the afflicted how to cope with them.
(This is not to say better nutrition, exercise, and sunlight can never help - they're often beneficial and it would be totally irresponsible to say they aren't. They just aren't magic cure-alls.)
There are also many ignorant beliefs about what mentally ill people are generally like, including:
--Being extremely violent.
--Having childlike minds or mentalities.
--Being unable to understand, let alone practice morality or ethics on any meaningful level.
--Being capable of doing ANYTHING because "they're just crazy."
One thing you might notice here is how many of these things boil down to believing that the afflicted is morally or spiritually deficient, or just isn't trying hard enough, or is a serious threat to others. Sometimes it comes down to believing it's their parents' fault. When beliefs like these pervade a culture, you've got a stigma.
I think the way to go would be to try to challenge these negative assumptions, or at the very least refuse to encourage them by showing them to be true in your story.

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Hello! How do I explain to my readers that the characters are asexual without stating outright? I am trying to look for the show don't tell method. Thanks!

You could have the character outright say it. Someone might ask something pertinent about your character's dating/love life, and your character might explain things at that point.

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Hey, I believe this might get somewhere. If the person training the dog is a elf who is able to speak with animals he/she might get them to focus long enough to create a weaker spell for the animal to use. However, there might be something different about it than if the dog was human. Thoughts?

As I said before, animals like dogs lack the mental acuity required to work magic. They lack the abstract reasoning/visualization skills it requires.

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+2 answers in: “In Soulmettle (I think it's called), do animals like cats and dogs have magical fields?”

I want weird exciting things, but I don't want my characters to have to get PTSD or whatever. What do I do?

Have you considered doing actual research into what all trauma can potentially entail? And maybe consider that depicting mental trauma (whether or not it's PTSD) is actually a good thing, as it boosts representation?

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My significant other is in a tabletop roleplaying campaign. They and another player suggested that their characters be in a relationship eventually. I'm uncomfortable with this, and have discussed it with my SO who has called it off. Am I being controlling, though? If they had really wanted (cont)

(cont) their characters to be in a relationship, I wouldn't have tried to stop it -- it just made me uncomfortable and I said so. Is that manipulation?
--------------------------------------------
There's nothing wrong with bringing up something that makes you uncomfortable, and if you discussed and resolved it without resorting to guilt tripping or moral posturing, then you weren't manipulative.

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Is making a character based on you the same as making a self-insert? I'm thinking of characters like Stan Marsh and Kyle Broflovski by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, Bill Murphy by Bill Burr, or Jerry Seinfeld literally played by himself. Are these inherently bad for being self-inserts?

They aren't inherently bad, no. What makes a self-insert actually work is a sense of humor, lots of self-awareness, and making sure you don't have character infatuation going on: http://www.springhole.net/writing/character-infatuation-and-over-identification.htm

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