Ask @The_YUNiversity:

there's someone send me a question here on askfm from alomst month ago and I want to answer that question now,, can I say "omg I just saw it now " or I just saw this now" if they both wrong what should i say??? how can I answer his question!!

Since it's ask.fm, you don't need to be overly formal. I suggest "OMG, I noticed it just now." If you want to be even less formal, "OMG, I just saw it now." πŸ‘ŒπŸ»

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"he never fails to make me happy and cry at once" Is this sentence grammatically correct ?

It is, but it sounds awkward. "He never fails to make me happy and sad at the same time" is more idiomatic. Also, if "at once" means 'immediately,' then "He never fails to make me instantly happy or sad" would make better sense.

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What do you mean, by unimaginable

It literally means 'difficult or impossible to imagine or understand.' Its synonyms include "unthinkable," "inconceivable," "indescribable," and "incredible." It is used to describe things that are either really terrible ("unimaginable pain," "unimaginable suffering," etc.) or amazing ("unimaginable joy," "unimaginable pleasure," etc.).

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What is more right? I can’t believe it’s already December or I can’t believe it’s December already?

We usually put "already" after the present simple or the past simple of "be," so "I can't believe it is already December" is technically better than the other way. But if you say it to a native speaker, they won't care either way.

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when someone write a tweet *Promise me no promises* and i want to write quote tweet , should I say, *This is a song by demi* or *that's a song by demi* or *it's a song by demi*

Go with "That's from a Demi Lovato song."

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Can you give an advice how to be confident in speaking english? I always get nervous when I’m speaking english that I always fucked up my interview.

Here's an article we wrote that should help: http://bit.ly/2qw4kNg
Good luck! πŸ‘πŸ»

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How to properly use don’t and doesn’t in sentences?

"Doesn't" works with he, she, it, and singular nouns:
- She doesn't drink coffee. β˜•οΈ
- It doesn't snow in Los Angeles.
- Peter doesn't like loud music. πŸ”Š
"Don't" works with I, you, we, they, and plural nouns.
- I don't think it's going to rain tomorrow.
- We don't agree on many things.
- Don't they know that tomorrow is a holiday?

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What are the differences between make and made?

"Make" is the present tense form for I, you, we, they, and plural nouns.
- I make sandwiches for lunch every day.
- You make amazing music. 🎺
- They make the best coffee in town. β˜•οΈ
"Made" is the past tense form for ALL nouns:
- She made three mistakes on her exam yesterday.
- We made a movie last week.
- They made a robot for their school project.

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β€œWhat sms app is famous in your country?”is this correct??

Although people would understand what you're asking, "Which sms app is popular in your country?" would be better.

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Hello do you have any advance adverb(-ly ending) list for ielts writing ?? My current writing score is 6.5 and i need to get 7.0 or above. Do u have any tips for reaching my goals? Thanks in advance^^

We didn't have such a list handy, so we found this one online. We hope it helps! πŸ™πŸ»

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What does it mean when people say he fires from all cylinders?

To "fire ON all cylinders" means to 'work or function at an extremely high level.' So if you saw a basketball team playing exceptionally well, you would say "They are firing on all cylinders! It will be tough to defeat them tonight." β›ΉπŸ»β™‚οΈ

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Enlight me or enlightened me?

"Enlighten me" basically means 'explain to me.' We often use it as an insult, suggesting that the other person is stupid or lying.
For example, "Oh, really? Please enlighten me as to how you came to the conclusion that the earth is flat." πŸ˜’
"Enlight me" is not standard English.

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Do the word 'foreigner' bring negative connotations?

It shouldn't, but in Trump's America, it sadly does. Racists often use it to distinguish themselves from "outsiders."
Therefore, instead of "She is a foreigner," we admins would say "She's from Japan" (or wherever their homeland is).

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What is the difference between scared & scary?

SCARED = afraid; frightened 😱
SCARY = frightening
So if you see something SCARY (e.g., a snake, lion, shark), you become SCARED.
Henry's friend is deathly SCARED of needles. He thinks they are SCARY.

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Can i say i "will not" or i "won't" which one is the right? and what is the difference between i "will not" and "won't"???

"Won't" is the contraction of "will not," so "I won't" is exactly the same thing as "I will not."
The only difference is how they are perceived in formal writing. Many teachers and editors do not like contractions in formal writing (papers, essays, reports), so they prefer "will not" to "won't."

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what is the meaning "come undone"?

"Come undone" has a literal sense and a figurative sense. Literally, when something comes undone, it means that whatever is fastening it is has become unfastened. For example, if your shoe laces have come undone, it means that they're untied.
In the figurative sense, it is often used to describe a person who is losing control of their feelings (mainly because of sadness). For example, "When she suddenly broke up with me, I couldn't eat or sleep. I came completely undone."
πŸ‘¨πŸŽ€ It's also the name of a popular Duran Duran song from many years ago: https://youtu.be/ICnlyNUt_0o

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I appreciate it or I'm appreciated? Are both acceptable? Thank you.

"I appreciate it" is what you say when you're grateful for something. For example, "Did you water my plants? If so, I appreciate it."
"I'm appreciated" (I am appreciated) means that you think you are valued and loved by other people. For example, "I'm appreciated at my work" means 'My boss and my colleagues at work respect me and treat me well.'
They are both acceptable, but as you can see, they mean different things.

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