Ask @The_YUNiversity:

Hi :) What does it mean when you are "bound" to do something? What does bound mean? Thank you very much.

It can mean two things: 1) you are obligated/required to do it (you are "bound" to it by a promise or duty); 2) you are definitely going to do it; you are destined to do it.
Here are some examples for each meaning:
1) You are bound to go to college; you promised your grandmother that you would.
1) Is he bound to pay the fine; he signed a contract.
2) Don't worry: you are bound to meet your soulmate one of these days.
2) The teacher told her students that they were bound to succeed.

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Hi again, can you please explain this sentence to me, "you work for me this summer, and I’ll take your wages off my fee, which your mother is paying"? Thank you.

The person is charging your mother a fee, which you can "pay" by working for them this summer. For example, if a tennis coach is charging your mother $1000/month for lessons, you can reduce that fee by working as his assistant for the summer.

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Which is right " I'm calling back him to me or I'm calling him back to me"? Please explain guys...

"I'm calling him back to me" is right. That's the usual order/sequence of words. For example, "I'm taking you home" is right, but not "I'm taking home you." For the same reason, "Can you drive me there?" is right, but "Can you drive there me?" is wrong.

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does this "Having the sheer brain processing power of thousands of volunteers is simply irreplaceable." mean our having to those thousands of volunteers with brain processing power is simply or thing that it's irreplaceable.?

It means that having the combined brain power of thousands of volunteers is so amazing and powerful that it cannot—and should not—be replaced.

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what is “legit” means?

"Legit" is slang. It's an abbreviation of "legitimate."
We use "legit" to say that something is authentic, genuine, or valid:
- That's a legit copy of "Game of Thrones."
- That ID is legit; let him in.
We also use "legit" to say that something or someone is excellent or cool:
- Yeah, G-DRAGON is legit: he sings, dances, raps, writes, and produces.
- Forget the haters: BTS is legit!
⚠️ IMPORTANT: Don't use "legit" in your essays for school or in important, professional emails.

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Could you explain this in anthor words?you are experiencing frustration, raise the bar when life throws you a lemon. Don’t make lemonade — that’s a cliché used too often. Make the best lemon meringue ever.Turn the lemons into gold bullion

In simple terms, it's saying that if you are going through hardships, turn those hardships (challenges, obstacles, problems) into something positive. Take them and grow, learn, change, and become a better person.
Additionally, "make lemonade out of lemons" is a cliché. People say it all the time to mean 'turn problems into positive outcomes.' In other words, instead of complaining about problems (lemons), turn them into lemonade (something positive).

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Which on is correct "it feels like when i used it in 2010", "it feels like when i was using it in 2010" or "it feels like when i using it on 2010"? I'm a little bit confused

The first one is correct: "It feels like when I used it in 2010" is the same as "It feels like (it did) when I used it in 2010." It works because "did" and "used" are referring to the same time (2010) and are in the same verb tense: past.

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which one is correct : If I were his girlfriend, what I would say was............. or If I were his girlfriend, what I would say is.......... thank you 😊😊😊

The second one is better. However, most native English speakers would choose neither. Instead, they would use “If I were his girlfriend, I would say ...” or “If I were his girlfriend, I would tell him ...”

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Hi, can I know what does it mean when someone says "I doubt so" and "I don't doubt so". What are the difference? I really don't understand this. Thank you. 💕

Hmm ... we've never heard anyone say "I doubt so" or "I don't doubt so." On the other hand, "I doubt it" and "I don't doubt it" are very common. You would say "I doubt it" if you don't think something is true. For example, if someone asked if I thought North Korea would win the next World Cup, I'd say "I doubt it." You would say "I don't doubt it" if you thought that something was possible (but you're also not 100% sure that it would happen). For example, if someone said "I think Donald Trump will be impeached," I might reply "I don't doubt it."

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What does though mean and when can I use it?

"Though" means 'despite the fact that' or 'although.' You use it to show a contrast: "Though I am hungry, I won't eat anything today." "Though it's raining and cold, I will go jogging." 🌧🌬🏃🏻♂️
It can also mean 'even if,' as in "I will copy the book by hand, slow though that may be; it will help me learn the material."
It can also mean 'however': "She craves lobster for dinner. She has no money though."

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is it true that when theres "dont" and "no" in a sentence, a double negative, it means "yes"? can you explain?

A double negative doesn't make it "positive"; it's just informal English. For example, "I ate barely no donuts yesterday" ("barely no" is a double negative) doesn't mean "I ate lots of donuts yesterday." 🙅🏻♀️ It's just slang for "I ate almost no donuts yesterday" or "I ate barely any donuts yesterday."
TL;DR: A double negative is slang/informal English. It's still a negative.

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