Ask @The_YUNiversity:

Is that true that Americans often make a fun of people (in public especially) who talk with the strange accent (because they are from ESL country)?

It has gotten a lot better because more Americans are becoming educated about people of other cultures. For example, in a city as diverse as Los Angeles, it is not very common. Besides, many Americans themselves are poor at speaking and writing in English. (And they're even worse at other languages.) We always spread the message from H. Jackson Brown Jr.'s quote—because it's so true. 🙏

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what is friendzone?

cqs
This is a stupid term.
If a guy tells a female friend that he likes her romantically, but she tells him that he is "just a friend" or "like a brother," some people might say that he is in the "friend zone" or that he has been "friendzoned."
This is an offensive term. It suggests that a girl who refuses to date a male friend is evil, manipulative, or cruel. However, there is nothing wrong for a girl to want to maintain a non-romantic friendship with a guy, even if that guy is madly in love with her. (She would only be cruel if she gave him confusing signals or played with his feelings.)
The same thing is true if the genders are reversed, i.e., if a girl likes a boy but he wants to just be friends.

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are people in america have a very good grammar or they also have a problem with their grammar?

MANY people in America are TERRIBLE at grammar. In fact, many students who learn English in foreign countries have a better understanding of English grammar than students who are born and raised in America. This is one of the unfortunate realities of the American educational system, not to mention the influence that bad grammar and spelling found on the Internet has on our students here. (This is why we always encourage those of you who are learning English as a second or third language to not give up. You might actually get better than many native speakers.)

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Difference between "I were" and "I was"?

"I was" is the standard simple past form:
- I was sick yesterday.
- I was tired, so I took a nap.
- I was the winner of last week's race.
"I were" → subjunctive mood. It is most often used with "if" and expresses a wish, a hypothetical situation, a demand, or a proposal:
- If I were you (but I'm not and I never can be), I would study for tomorrow's exam.
- If I were six feet taller (but I'm not and I never can be), I would be a giant.
- If I were a ghost, I wouldn't live in a cemetery.
- If I were Monkey D. Luffy, I would ask Bartolomeo and Cavendish to become honorary Straw Hats.
For more on "I were" (the subjunctive), read this article: http://bit.ly/1pWL29H

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Why did Britney Spears use "everytime"? She is from the US, right? Doesn't she know about this?

Most singers/songwriters do not care about grammar, and it's not their job to care. They aren't teachers; they're entertainers. We admins never get upset when our favorite singers, athletes, or actors use improper grammar or spelling—because that's not the reason why we admire them. ✌️

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what is the meaning of 'friendzone' ?

"Friend zone" is a stupid term.
If a guy tells a female friend that he likes her romantically, but she tells him that he is "just a friend" or "like a brother," some people might say that he is in the "friend zone" or that he has been "friendzoned."
This is an offensive term. It suggests that a girl who refuses to date a male friend is evil, manipulative, or cruel. However, there is nothing wrong for a girl to want to maintain a non-romantic friendship with a guy, even if that guy is madly in love with her. (She would only be cruel if she gave him confusing signals or played with his feelings.)
The same thing is true if the genders are reversed, i.e., if a girl likes a boy but he wants to just be friends.

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hi, i just wanna know, what can i do in order to improve my english

1. Read A LOT. Read often. Pay very close attention to how sentences are written. Write down and look up words you don't understand. Use those words in sentences.
2. Read translated manga and English comic books for dialogue, idioms, and vocabulary words. Learn how English-speakers talk to each other. Try reading out loud.
3. Write every day. (Here are some tips: http://bit.ly/1rOMbVx)
4. Use Google to answer questions you have. If that's too much work or too confusing, then follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/The_YUNiversity) or look at our A-Z archive with explanations to common questions: http://theyuniversityarchive.tumblr.com
5. Listen to English-speaking songs. (Do not listen to rap to improve your speaking skills; rap music is great for slang and vocabulary, but it generally has atrocious grammar.)
6. Watch English-speaking movies and TV shows. Start with easy shows (cartoons) and work up to more sophisticated ones.
8. Practice. Practice. Practice.
Good luck! (⌒ ͜ʖ⌒)-b

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