Ask @The_YUNiversity:

hey, how are you guys doing? Can you explain for me the differences between "When you get off the plane, I will be waiting for you. " and "When you get off the plane, I will wait for you. " Thanks :) Keep doing the good work.

Hi. 🙋🏻‍♀️
The first one is what most people say. It means that I will already be at the arrival gate when you get off the plane.
The second one is awkward, and no native speaker would say it. "When you get off the plane, I will wait WITH you" would work better. That would mean that I will stay with you once you get off the plane.
We hope that clears things up.

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What's the difference between in and on?

Dewa Ayu
Prepositions are extremely tricky. Honestly, the best way to understand how they work is to memorize usage (how they're used).
Take a look at the pictures we've attached; they should give you lots of examples of how "in" and "on" are used.
If you prefer a video explanation, take a look at this: https://youtu.be/Lr1BBoNu6hI
Here's another video: https://youtu.be/sN5H7YTo_IQ

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What does "soldier on" means? I found it in a book but don't quite get the meaning. Thanks before.

No problem.
To "soldier on" basically means 'to continue doing something although it is difficult.' For example, "Fans admired the way the boxer soldiered on after breaking his hand during the fight."
That's our time for today. We'll be back to answer more questions next Wednesday (8/15).
Soldier on, everyone! 💪🏻

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Is 'irregardless' a real word? Can I use it an essay? I hear lots of different things about it and would like your opinion. Thanks in advance.

Ooh ... we have strong opinions about this. Technically, it's a "real" word—it's in the dictionary, after all. However, it's considered an informal variant of "regardless" or "irrespective." In fact, we think of it as the "bastard child" of those two words. Don't use "irregardless" in anything that matters (school papers, professional emails, etc.). Just use "regardless" and save yourself a ton of grief and drama. Doing so will also keep the Grammar Nazis and Grammar Police away. 😉

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Welcome back! I've always wondered what the easiest way to learn vocabs is? Can you recommend some tips? Thanx in advance.

Hi! 🙋🏻‍♀️
As you might have guessed, we prefer learning vocabulary the fun way, which includes watching anime (with English subtitles) and playing video games. Check out this article, which gives helpful tips on building your vocabulary without having to memorize hundreds of flash cards or reading boring books: http://bit.ly/2v96qDo
And the best way to memorize words forever is to make mnemonics (memory devices). We wrote a whole article about it, including lots of examples: http://bit.ly/2mWnqYR

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Whats is lowkey mean?

"Low-key" basically means 'not flashy' or 'not showy': My friends just had a low-key wedding; they invited only 20 close friends and held the reception at a local park.
People often use it nowadays informally as a synonym for "secret": Keep it low-key, but my friend cheated on the exam.
💁🏻‍♂️ In formal writing or in professional emails, don't use "low-key" in that sense. Use "discreet" or some other synonym instead.

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my english teacher taught me that in conditional sentences type 2, the form is "if + S + were..." it doesn't matter whoever the pronoun is, the nouns is "were". is that true? bc in actual life and movies, they don't use it...

After a looooooong hiatus, we're back! 🙌🏻
Your teacher is correct. We call that the subjunctive mood, and you can check out our article about it here: http://bit.ly/2Me7saM
In spoken English (and especially in pop culture, e.g., movies, songs, TV shows), it's not very commonly used. That's why Justin Bieber famously sang, "If I was your boyfriend" and Gwen Stefani sang, "I'd have all the money in the world if I was a rich girl."

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Hi :) What does it mean when you are "bound" to do something? What does bound mean? Thank you very much.

It can mean two things: 1) you are obligated/required to do it (you are "bound" to it by a promise or duty); 2) you are definitely going to do it; you are destined to do it.
Here are some examples for each meaning:
1) You are bound to go to college; you promised your grandmother that you would.
1) Is he bound to pay the fine; he signed a contract.
2) Don't worry: you are bound to meet your soulmate one of these days.
2) The teacher told her students that they were bound to succeed.

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Hi again, can you please explain this sentence to me, "you work for me this summer, and I’ll take your wages off my fee, which your mother is paying"? Thank you.

The person is charging your mother a fee, which you can "pay" by working for them this summer. For example, if a tennis coach is charging your mother $1000/month for lessons, you can reduce that fee by working as his assistant for the summer.

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