Ask @betaveros:

After reading your link, I can't believe people think RSA keys are secure. Although, and this might sound naïve/dumb, but what is safer?

RSA *is* secure*, if you do it right. Crypto is hard to do right; a theoretically secure cryptosystem can very often be compromised by some tiny detail implemented incorrectly. The link describes an attack on RSA when key generation is not done right.
As far as I'm aware, the alternative to RSA is elliptic curve cryptography. I don't understand the mathematics behind it (yet), though.
* unless, of course, the NSA or somebody has an unpublished algorithm that breaks it, and until quantum computers are well-developed enough to make Shor's algorithm practical...

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Reading a book on cryptology and it talks about Euclid's algorithm. I'm wondering if I should I read more about it? Other than finding the GCD, is it useful?

g
I'd say no, with the caveat that finding the GCD is *extremely* useful and that that application alone makes it worth understanding.
You can use it to find the GCD of numbers and do all sorts of fancy number theory, but you can also find the GCD of polynomials, and more generally Euclidean domains, which are basically "places where the Euclidean algorithm works". Proving that the Euclidean algorithm works is a common way (possibly the most common?) to prove that a ring is a unique factorization domain; this covers the rings of Gaussian integers and of Eisenstein integers, for example. I don't have time to give more details or background, but I guess these things are all on Wikipedia.
In an even more real-world application, you can crack badly generated RSA keys with it: https://sbseminar.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/the-recent-difficulties-with-rsa/

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Is that because you don't like competitions, or just not that one. btw, I saw your name written in HM and I thought it was pretty awesome! :)

I think the correct response here is "mu". It's more just a feeling that it's not for me any more, but it's really hard to explain briefly; I might finish and publish my blog post about this at some point in the next few years.

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Just curious, are you doing 18 + 6 double major or just 18? What is your field of interest right now?

I'm 18C right now. Double-majoring is still entirely possible, as is staying as such and getting a minor in music or something; I have decided not to decide this too soon.
Did you know that "[e]xcept for the fact that nimbers form a proper class and not a set, the class of nimbers determines an algebraically closed field of characteristic 2"? That's a really interesting field.

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whats your current opinion of chaotic_iak?

wat?
Okay fine I'll play. I don't know how the guy manages to be constantly coming up with all these PuzzleScriptable ideas. It's crazy. I also don't know how the guy manages to deal with giving away all his dark secrets to the Internet. Those are the two big things I get off the top of my head, beyond which I know him to be a good friend, excellent source of math/CS/puzzle-flavored chat topics, and valuable subject for furtive cultural-anthropological observation.

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Since when are you a furry?

Straight to the hard questions! I guess I figured out that the fandom existed and that I might want to be part of it around mid-2013. But in a looser sense, I think I've had thoughts about anthropomorphic animals and related concepts since elementary school, if not earlier. I remember having thought a lot about a shapeshifting character with green hair and his origin story back then. Then again, maybe it's kind of pointless to draw the line there, since just about everybody would be a furry by those standards given how many children's cartoons feature anthropomorphism.
But speaking of children's cartoons, I will note particularly fond, albeit fuzzy, memories of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Tales . That's something I could only reasonably have watched in the U.S., which means it occurred before elementary school.

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What was your favourite mystery hunt puzzle?

My opinion is not going to be particularly insightful because I've only done a handful of them, but among those I solved a little of, perhaps Callooh Callay, World! (Round The Red and White Knights, 2014; http://web.mit.edu/puzzle/www/2014/puzzle/callooh_callay_world/ ).
On the other hand, among puzzles I've just gawked at and read the solutions of, the most inspirational is still Space Monkey Mafia (Round Richard Feynman, 2013; http://web.mit.edu/puzzle/www/2013/coinheist.com/feynman/space_monkey_mafia/index.html )

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What is the worst thing about living in Taiwan?

The language barrier.
It's a funny thing to say, since I have had ten years of honors lessons in Chinese and can read, write, listen, speak, and carry out everyday conversations just as well as I can in English. I'm not talking about being unable to read classical Chinese either. Nobody can unless you already know what it's saying.
But as a high-school sophomore trying to learn about technology and history and politics and current events and pop culture, and to comprehend it, discuss it, and share it with people, everyday vocabulary is not enough. The number of words or terms I need to know grows exponentially with the number of topics I'm trying to learn about. Political parties and terms, all my AP Biology vocabulary, outlandish data structures, every eponymous theorem ever --- I can't talk about it in Chinese. In particular, people transliterate Western names into Chinese very inconsistently. This is an issue everywhere there are things named after people, which is, uh, everywhere. So sometimes I feel a disconnect from, or an inability to properly discuss, the social issues my country is getting riled up about. It's kind of hard to think analytically under such conditions. And generally I just can't spout nerdy chat topics to people in Chinese.
(I spent something like an hour coming up with different bad things and grilling myself about which was worst to me --- I think I'm doing this wrong.)

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