Ask @bighominid:

Why are you doing this?

I found this site at random and got interested—simple as that. I'm doing this to be able to interact with readers in a forum that's somewhat different from blog comment threads. On my blog, I ask people to leave comments that are relevant to the posts they're commenting on, which means that any interaction with readers must necessarily be channeled in a specific direction. Here, the Q&A format is open. Anything goes, which makes this a more relaxed space in which to ask questions. It may also be a bit more of a personal format for interaction, although how personal it is may depend on how personal the questions are.

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Is there anything better about living in Daegu than Seoul?

Not that I can see. Technically, I lived in Hayang, a small town that is a satellite of Daegu. Hayang is so small that it doesn't even have its own movie theater; to see a flick, you have to take a bus and/or subway to Gyeongsan City or to Daegu proper. I liked walking around Hayang, but the scenery was quite limited.
Daegu wasn't bad, as big cities go, but for some reason, life in North Gyeongsang Province (Gyeong-buk for short) just didn't fit me. Maybe it was the ambient mentality of the people—a bit slower, a bit less dynamic. Maybe it was that damn southern accent, which I never got used to even after a year of living there.
Every time I took a trip up to Seoul, I felt energized the moment the train would arrive in Seoul Station. Seoul has always felt like the pulsing center, the heart of Korea, the Place Where Big Things Happen. That feeling, that energy, was lacking in Daegu.
Then, of course, there's the weather. Daegu's winter, last year, was disappointingly warm compared to Seoul's, and Daegu's summer is known throughout the peninsula for being extremely hot and humid. Seoul is bad in the summer too, granted, but not as bad as Daegu.
Finally, the thing that drove me most nuts was my students at the Catholic University of Daegu. I had one or two gems there, but for the most part, the kids couldn't find their asses if they farted. Catholic U. was a lower-tier school; it had plenty of money, and the campus was beautiful, but all that money seemed wasted as the school graduated battalion after battalion of dud students—dull, unmotivated zombies with no initiative, no sense of responsibility, no drive, and no curiosity about anything except their cell phones. That, more than anything, became so depressing to me that I knew I had to bugger out.
So on every count I can think of, Seoul kicks Daegu's ass. Some of the confirmed Daeguite expats I knew down there would counterargue that Seoul is way too crowded and dirty. Daegu is dirty, too, and Seoul's crowds are manageable once you figure out how best to avoid them.

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Why do you answer questions from strangers?

I'm an introvert in many ways, but this is an interactional format that both satisfies my desire to communicate with people and keeps me at a distance from the madding crowd. And maybe there's an arrogant part of me that just likes being in a position where I'm answering questions instead of asking them.

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What is the most stressful job?

Even though I'm a teacher and I work with people, I'd say that service-oriented jobs—like being a restaurant server or doing customer-service phone work or working as an airline ticket-counter representative—would drive me utterly insane, and I'd end up killing the first customer who proved to be too snotty. Would probably be fired the very first day.

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What do you like to cook?

I like to cook and prep many, many different things. Here are a few: budae-jjigae, pulled-pork BBQ quesadillas, frittatas, golbaengi dwaenjang-jjigae, fancy sandwiches, burgers, hot American-style breakfasts (sausage, egg, bacon, potatoes in all styles, etc.), fettuccine Alfredo, spaghetti bolognese, salade niçoise, salmon burgers with wasabi mayo, escargot in butter-garlic-parsley, etc. Many, many things.

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