Ask @The_YUNiversity:

hello, why do i never see future perfect tense? how to use it?

It's probably not as common as some of the other tenses, but it's not completely rare.
Here is an example: "I predict that by the time I arrive, Nan WILL HAVE SPENT all my money at the clothing store." πŸ’Έ
Here's a good explanation from Education First: "The future perfect tense refers to a completed action in the future. When we use this tense we are projecting ourselves forward into the future and looking back at an action that will be completed some time later than now."
Here are some more examples:
- Cheer up: you WILL HAVE COMPLETED two-thirds of the program by this time next month.
- I know it's hard right now, but you WILL HAVE EARNED three degrees by the time most people earn just one.

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"S + wish + S + Verb 2" is it correct? why verb 2? what's the type of sentence? thank you!β™‘

"I wish John wrote more often" or "I wish John would (past tense) write more often" would both meet your requirement. They express hypothetical/wish situations, i.e., the subjunctive mood.
You can learn more about the subjunctive mood here: http://bit.ly/2Me7saM
Or here (if you prefer watching videos): https://youtu.be/-vefS0B1DIY

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Do I say "I also like something " or "I like something also"

Let's replace "something" with a specific word and see what happens:
- I also like ice cream. β†’ This could mean "I like (something that is not ice cream) and I also like ice cream."
- I like ice cream also. β†’ This means "Me too: I like ice cream."
So, depending on what you're trying to say, you would move "also" to the appropriate place. Of course, context (other sentences before and after that one) would also help the reader/listener get a clearer picture of your intended meaning.

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what comes after 'any' should be in singular form right ? foe instance : It can be (any value/ any values).

Nope. It can be either singular or plural:
- I don't have any friends in Chicago. β†’ βœ”
- You can bring any friend with you to the party. β†’ βœ”
- Any value higher than zero will result in an error. β†’ βœ”
- You can input any values you want into the box. β†’ βœ”
- They don't really care: any answer will do. β†’ βœ” (They only expect one answer.)
- They don't really care: any answers will do. β†’ βœ” (They expect more than one answer.)
Unfortunately, there is no standard rule that specifies when to use singular or plural nouns after "any." There are too many exceptions and it gets very complicated.

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a group of people (is/are) ...

In American English, collective nouns like "group," "team," "squad," etc. are treated like regular nouns. In other words, since "a group" is singular, it would require "is" (not "are").
In British English, collective nouns are more often treated as plurals that require plural verbs. Therefore, it would be "a group of people ARE ..."
Since we admins are Americans, we would say "A group of people IS waiting patiently in line." However, our friends in other parts of the world are more likely to say "A group of people ARE waiting patiently in line."
We hope this helps! πŸ‘πŸ»

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what’s the difference between had and has?

Has β†’ present tense for he, she, it, and singular nouns:
- Peter has a black car.
- Nan has a lot of clothes.
- Henry has a lot of shoes.
- It has been very hot lately.
- She has the largest house in the neighborhood.
Had β†’ past tense of "have":
- Peter had no appointments yesterday, so he went to the cafe and relaxed.
- Nan had to get a shot from the doctor yesterday.
- Chewie and Henry had fun at the beach on Monday.
- We had three exams last week.
- I had a sore throat yesterday, but it feels better today.

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I suggested he buy the dictionary. How come the verb buy must be in root word ? Explain and provide more examples. Thanks.

That's because it's the subjunctive mood.
The following [verbs + "that"] often attract (for lack of a better word) the subjunctive mood: "ask," "command," "demand," "determine," "insist," "order," "prefer," "recommend," "require," and "suggest." And these [adjectives + "that"] do likewise: "crucial," "essential," "important," "imperative," and "necessary."
With either the aforementioned verbs or adjectives, we use the base form of the verb (the way the verb would appear as a dictionary entry, i.e., without -s, -ed, or -ing), regardless of the noun or pronoun.
Here are some more examples:
1. The teacher suggested that Peter go (not β€œgoes”) to study hall after class to get help in geometry.
2. I insist that Nan put (not β€œputs”) her phone away before the exam starts.
3. The editor said it was essential that Henry meet (not β€œmeets”) the deadline.
4. We demand that this post end (not β€œends”) soon.

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(For those / To those) who have been asking me about the tips, I will share with you soon. How to use it. Clarify

In those examples, they're both fine. They will both convey the same message. Here's how:
1. (This message is) For those who have been asking me about the tips ...
2. (I am saying this) To those who have been asking me about the tips ...
The parts that are in ( ) will be assumed by the listener/reader. Since it's colloquial English (i.e., not overly formal), the listener/reader will know exactly what you're trying to say. It's not a matter of pure grammar; it's more of a preference.

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what's the difference between anymore & any more. anytime & any time every time / everytime

As adverbs, "anymore" and "any more" are the same. They both mean 'any longer,' e.g., "I don't like cookies anymore" = "I don't like cookies any more."
However, "any more" can be used in a way that "anymore" can't: "I don't want any more phone calls today," which means 'I want no more phone calls today.' (You can't write "I don't want anymore phone calls today." πŸ™…πŸ»β€β™€οΈ)
"Any time" = any amount of time: "Nan doesn't have *any time* to play video games due to her busy schedule.
"Anytime" = whenever: "Call me *anytime* you're sad; I'm always here for you."
"Every time" is right; "everytime" is wrong. Don't trust any of the song titles that use "Everytime." (However, you can trust SHINee's correct usage: "Every Time.")

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There is no ...OR There are no ... How to use which is which ? Thanks.

Use "There is no" with singular or uncountable nouns:
- I'm sorry to say this, but there is no hope for you.
- There is no way that I could lose to you in FIFA 18.
- There is no milk available at the market. πŸ₯›
Use "There are no" with plural nouns:
- There are no dogs running around outside. πŸ•
- There are no flowers in Henry's yard.
- There are no eggs in the refrigerator. πŸ₯š
It's been fun answering your questions today. We won't be in town next Wednesday, so we'll hold our Q&A session on Monday (Aug. 20, 1–2 PM Los Angeles time). Take care, everyone!

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How long have you been using it ? Hong have you used it ? What's the difference betwen these two sentences ?

They can mean the same thing, if you're talking about a long-term action (days, weeks, months, etc.). For example, "(For) How long have you been using your phone as a calculator?" = "(For) How long have you used your phone as a calculator?"
But if you're talking about a short-term action (minutes, hours), they mean different things:
"(For) How long have you been using the iPad today?" means that you're still using it right now.
"(For) How long have you used the iPad today?" means that you stopped using it recently today.

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Have done... Had done... How to use these two grammatically.

"Have done" is the present perfect tense. It is used when the action was completed recently or just now: "I have done more work today than you did all of last week."
"Had done" is the past perfect tense. It refers to something which happened earlier in the past, before another action that also took place in the past: "Before my mom came (past action) to pick me up from school, I had done (even earlier past action) almost all of my homework."
Here's more information on PRESENT PERFECT / PAST PERFECT: http://bit.ly/2KVoTs4

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Is memorizing bad for learning?

You're probably asking if memorizing is bad for learning English (not math, science, etc.). Memorizing is not necessarily bad. For instance, memorizing idioms, prepositions, and spelling can be useful. But for vocabulary and grammar, consistent practice is much more effective. (Knowing a word's definition doesn't mean that you know how to use that word correctly in a sentence.)

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hey, how are you guys doing? Can you explain for me the differences between "When you get off the plane, I will be waiting for you. " and "When you get off the plane, I will wait for you. " Thanks :) Keep doing the good work.

Hi. πŸ™‹πŸ»β€β™€οΈ
The first one is what most people say. It means that I will already be at the arrival gate when you get off the plane.
The second one is awkward, and no native speaker would say it. "When you get off the plane, I will wait WITH you" would work better. That would mean that I will stay with you once you get off the plane.
We hope that clears things up.

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